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Posts Tagged ‘azure’

Anglebrackets Conference – Day 3

I have been fortunate to attend this year’s Anglebrackets conference in Las Vegas. (See my coverage of Day 1 here and Day 2 here.)

The following are my notes from the Day 3 keynote, “Conversations with Microsoft.”

image_dbbecd7b-9298-4dde-993a-acd9d9461515The speaker: Steve Guggenheimer, corporate VP and chief evangelist.

A lot of changes at Microsoft over last year. New CEO, Satya Nadella

Not changed: We always be partner-led

Our Core – productivity platform for mobile-first, cloud-first world

4 engineering units at MS

  1. Devices platform.

Converging Xbox, Windows , WP and RT into single platform. Universal apps and One Windows.

VS 2015 preview is out. Demo: creating universal app from template.

  1. First-party devices (Surface, Lumia phones, Band, etc).
  2. First-party services (Office 365, Bing, Yammer, Skype, et). Cross-platform APIs and SDKs.
  3. Azure 

Microsoft Developer approach:

  • Innovation
  • Agility
  • Openness

Demo: VS2015 – targeting multiple devices with Apache Cordova plugin for VS. Using Android emulator for VS.

Demo: using remote IE (Azure service for testing on IE) on Mac, iPad and Android tablet.

http://remote.modern.ie

Announcement: Open sourcing .NET Core Runtime and Framework. .NET running on Linux and Mac. Free VS 2013 Community edition.

Read the rest of this post »

Anglebrackets Conference – Day 2

I have been fortunate to attend this year’s Anglebrackets conference in Las Vegas. (See my coverage of Day 1 here.)

The following are my notes from the Day 2 keynote, The Integration of Technologies with Office 365. The speaker: Rob Leffers, the director of program management for the Office 365 apps team.

image_dbbecd7b-9298-4dde-993a-acd9d9461515Agenda
– Our vision
– What’s next
– Futures
– Calls to action

Intersections
– Office
– Visual Studio
– Azure

Connect to Office 365 services
– Users and groups
– Files
– Mail
– Calendar
– Contacts

Build using an open platform
– Azure
– .Net
– Android
– iOS
– Html5
– Xamarin

Robust Office 365 APIs
– designed for openness and flexibility
– Consistent development platform
– Powering a world of devices

Read the rest of this post »

Anglebrackets Conference – Day 1 Keynote

I’m lucky to be able to attend this year’s Anglebrackets conference in Las Vegas and I’ll try to cover the conference in this Perficient blog as much as I can. Today was the opening day of the conference, which actually consisted only of the opening keynote. The speaker was Scott Guthrie, Executive VP of Cloud and Enterprise group at Microsoft. He was wearing his signature red shirt. His keynote was titled, “The Cloud For Modern Business.”

image_dbbecd7b-9298-4dde-993a-acd9d9461515The following are my notes from his keynote:

Mobile first, cloud first.

Why cloud? Cloud enables:

1. Quick and easy deployment.
– No need to wait for provisioning. Demo: database deployed in Azure in few clicks. Sharepoint server farm deployed in few seconds.

2. Elastic capacity.
– no need to buy infrastructure
– unexpected load easily managed
– global coverage with unprecedented scale
Example: XBox One game Titanfall is completely cloud powered. 200,000 VMs were spun off on launch day.

3. Pay only for what you use
– no upfront costs
– no long-term commitment
– no wasted capacity
Example: slide with a typical web site usage pattern (a saw) illustrating unused capacity. Azure allows to avoid that by allowing automatic scaleup and down.

4. Enable new business value
– engage customers with web and mobile
– big data analytics
– machine learning Read the rest of this post »

Microsoft Azure updates for October

microsoft-azure-logo_11368901Every month Microsoft is releasing new Azure services and promoting other services from preview state to general availability. In October this year a few news services were released and a few graduated to general availability.

– Azure Automation is now generally available. Azure Automation is essentially a PowerShell scripting in the cloud. Microsoft was recommending to script Azure deployment tasks for a long time, but previously the scripting capabilities were limited by developer’s computer. Now, using  Azure Automation it’s possible to actually run PowerShell scripts in Azure cloud, create jobs and schedule them at given times, create automation workflows. These PowerShell workflows are called “runbooks”. Microsoft is providing a comprehensive catalog of ready to use runbooks made to automate and manage different part of Azure: web site, cloud storage, media service, VMs, etc.

– Azure Service Bus received a new feature – Event Hubs. Event Hubs is hyper-scalable pub/sub event ingestor which can ingest data from millions of telemetry events per second so it could be processed by Azure cloud services. Event Hubs is designed for use with “internet of things” (IoT) – cloud-connected devices with sensors.

– Microsoft Animalware for Cloud Services and VMs graduated to general availability. Microsoft Antimalware is a service and SDK enabling protection of cloud services and VMs from malware.

– Instance-level public IPs are now generally available. It’s now possible to directly assign a public IP to VM or a web or worker role. Limit of two public IPs per subscription was removed.

– Elastic Scale preview is now available for SQL Azure. Elastic Scale is a set of .NET libraries and management tools making horizontal scale-out (sharding) of SQL Azure servers easier. Sharding was a recommended scale-out (and scale-in) pattern for Azure SQL for a while. However, implementation of sharding required custom coding and writing management scripts (or manual management of SQL instances). Now it’s much easier to implement.

– Azure Batch is now in public preview. Azure Batch is new platform which is enabling user to run large scale parallel applications on thousands of virtual machines, auto-scale depending on work in the queue, monitor job progress and stage data and build computing pipelines.

– Stream Analytic is now available in public preview. Stream Analytics is a realtime event processing engine and built to process mullions of telemetric events per seconds when used together with Event Hubs.

– Data Factory is now available in public preview. Azure Data Factory is a framework for creating, managing and orchestration of data pipelines for connecting all kinds of data sources (SQL on premises or Azure, Azure tables or blobetc) to Hadoop cluster .

How Microsoft is embracing open source

Microsoft_LOVES_Linux

When I recently researched different caching options in Microsoft Azure, I ran across the following article on MSDN: Which Azure Cache offering is right for me? This article almost shocked me because it was unapologetically advising all new developments to use Redis cache over other Microsoft-developed Azure caching services. Just think about that for a moment: Microsoft invested plenty of time and money to develop two separate Azure caching services: Managed Cache Service and In-Role Cache… and then to abandon both in favor of an open source alternative (Redis)?!

This signals a no less than a seismic shift in regards to how Microsoft is treating open source. It’s no secret that Microsoft used to not exactly be friendly to the open source movement, preferring in-house development (which they have a full control of) over community-developed code. However, over years, Microsoft developed a much friendlier attitude towards open source software by opening its own products (like ASP.NET MVC framework), integrating with open source products (like the addition of Git support to Visual Studio) and supporting open source products and frameworks in its Azure cloud offering.

So, why is Microsoft doing this? In the case of Azure caching services, it looks like Redis is simply providing more features than Microsoft’s own caching solution and it’s robust enough to keep up with any load. Plus, it’s supported by a thriving development community. It seems like it’s a no-brainer for Microsoft to embrace Redis, because they are essentially getting a great product and support for free!

Another example of the growing open source support at Microsoft is Linux. For years Microsoft was looking at Linux as a direct Windows competitor. Now, as Microsoft is becoming more of a product and services company, it’s happily embracing Linux support in Azure. It’s as easy to create a Linux VM in Azure as launching a new Windows VM. Now, they are letting it be a customer’s choice to decide which operating system to use, as Microsoft will provide cloud infrastructure for both OSs.

I thinks this growing open-source support inside Microsoft is a very positive development, and a win-win situation for everybody.

O365 & Azure: PIH’s New Tools in the Fight for Global Health

Partners in Health’s mission is to provide a preferential option for the poor in healthcare. By establishing long-term relationships with sister organizations based in settings of poverty, Partners In Health (PIH) strives to achieve two overarching goals: to bring the benefits of modern medical science to those most in need and to serve as an antidote to despair.

PIH draws on the resources of the world’s leading medical and academic institutions to expand access to high-quality care for poor and marginalized patients throughout the world. The root of their mission is both medical and moral, based on solidarity rather than charity alone.

Chris Sweeney / Partners In Health

Chris Sweeney / Partners In Health

Perficient is assisting PIH with their migration to Microsoft’s Office 365 (O365) solution. O365 will allow users to access their email from anywhere in the world on any computer or mobile device with access to the Internet. OneDrive for O365 will enhance collaboration between all PIH users, both domestically and internationally. The platform will provide PIH with a reliable and secure communication toolbox, including storage and collaboration tools. Deployment of O365 across PIH sites in Africa, Haiti, Russia, and the U.S. will enable PIH’s mission to provide a preferential option for the poor in healthcare  and will be an important tool to enhance communication as they respond to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

The current Ebola outbreak is a global challenge and will require collaboration from many players. PIH, which has said it is “radically invitational” and is seeking partners to help respond, recently explained in a blog post that it is

working alongside two outstanding grassroots organizations—Last Mile Health in Liberia and Wellbody Alliance in Sierra Leone. These longtime PIH partners are already working to train health workers, identify sick patients, and deliver quality care. As the epidemic advances, these groups need support to provide comprehensive prevention, care, and treatment.”

Why will Office 365 have an impact?

Enabling a global collaboration and communication platform will allow PIH to share information seamlessly with colleagues, partners and all involved in the fight against disease in developing countries while helping to further PIH’s ability to deliver community based care.  Cloud based storage means that documents can be accessed at any time from any device in any setting, including those where bandwidth is limited.

Identity Management using Microsoft AzureAzure Diagram

Perficient has architected PIH’s cloud identity management by deploying several components in Azure including the following:

• O365 Directory Synchronization Server: to synchronize PIH user information with O365
• End User and O365 Management Server: to provide remote technical leads around the world with the capability to manage end users in their respective countries
• Domain Controllers: to provide geographic resiliency for Active Directory

The use of Azure will take PIH out of the server management business and allow them to focus on delivering healthcare.

Global Rollout of Office 365

Perficient and PIH have completed a rollout of Office 365 Exchange Online to the PIH domestic users and are in the process of initiating an international pilot with Haiti and Rwanda. In future blog posts we’ll showcase the impact Office 365 is having on PIH’s capability to collaborate globally and the positive effects this is providing to PIH’s most remote locations.

The CIO’s Guide to Understanding Microsoft Cloud Services

Over the last few years, the software market has changed shape. According to Joanne Correia, research vice president at Gartner, the cloud is the main driver behind that change.

Given this, over the same time period, azureit makes sense to see Microsoft moving its core business functions to the cloud (and the other major software vendors doing the same). While this is hardly a revelation, if you haven’t yet taken a hard look at the cloud, and what it has to offer your business – now is probably a good time.

Perficient recently published a new white paper, “The CIO’s Guide to Understanding Microsoft Cloud Services,” for executives who are examining Microsoft’s cloud service offerings (Azure, Office 365, Project Online, TFS Online, Dynamics CRM Online) as a way to contain and scale back exploding IT costs and become more nimble.

The guide begins by reviewing some common terms and concepts before diving into deeper cloud-related concepts. It goes on to discuss the changing datacenter and then evaluates both Azure and Office 365, in terms of capabilities as well as security, privacy and compliance. Finally, the guide includes steps to get you started with Microsoft cloud services.

To learn more about Microsoft’s cloud-based services, and see how your organization can benefit from Azure and Office 365, download the new guide from our Microsoft cloud experts.

The Premise of On Premises

As a technical architect I am used to the rapid evolution of language to describe an accelerating technical world. Only a couple of years ago using the word Cloud would most likely conjure images of the cumulonimbus variety. Today I rarely join a conference call where The Cloud is not mentioned and we can be confident in technical circles that everybody understands the term.

The Cloud

According to Wikipedia, references to The Cloud began as early as 1996 when Compaq used the term in an internal document. Much later Amazon began to use it as part of their Elastic Compute Cloud terminology. We now use the term to describe great new services like Azure and Office 365.

I like The Cloud and feel it is a very fitting term for describing the way we now host services. My compliments to whomever actually first coined the term! It makes a lot of sense.

Now that we have The Cloud we have the premise of On Premises and need a term to clearly refer to services hosted on site (as opposed to in The Cloud).

So, do you say On Premises or On Premise?

On Premises

On Premises

Premises

“A house or building, together with its land and outbuildings, occupied by a business or considered in an official context.”

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/premises

Premise

“(British also premiss) Logic A previous statement or proposition from which another is inferred or follows as a conclusion.”

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/premise

Was it a Mistake?

It seems clear to me that On Premises is correct whereas On Premise is derived from a mistake made and copied many thousands (millions?) of times.

I find the discussion interesting because I think it highlights the rapid adoption of terminology, correct or otherwise. As technical professionals I think we should always strive to communicate better. Describing technology more accurately, clearly and concisely is important and will help us serve the needs of decision makers and users better. I think we should always question the terminology we use and improve upon it whenever possible.

Everything You Need to Know About Delve & Office Graph

Ok, I’ve got to admit I really meant to say “Almost everything you need to know in first Release.”

The more you share, the more you get. Believe in that? Office 365 community does and as a result , this week Microsoft hosted “Delve Yamjam” to coincide with the launch of the new Office 365 product called “Delve”. (If you are new to I highly recommend reading earlier articles here and here to get to know your new friend Delve). Look at a screenshot of Delve from my demo tenant, looks pretty cool, huh?

Delve Img1

Some great questions asked some great thoughts shared. I summarize here for the larger community. Microsoft responses were from Christophe Fiessinger, Kady Dundas, Josh Stickler, Mark Kashman, Cem Aykan and on the phone Ashok Kuppusamy, Stefan Debald, Fredrik Holm, John Toews, and Robin Miller.

  • Which Office 365 business plans includes Delve?
    • Delve is included in the Office 365 E1 – E4 subscription plans (and the corresponding A2 – A4 and G1 – G4 plans for Academic and Government customers respectively)
  • Can I protect data from ever being shown in others Delve results?
    • Yes, Delve only shows documents based on permissions set and inherit those from OneDrive and SharePoint online. Also each card will have a sharing control and “who can see this” option
    • If your folder and contents are not shared with anyone, they will not appear in Delve for anyone. It always respect the permissions set on the items.
  • Which kinds of data is considered “private data”?
    • There’s both the concept of private data (e.g. files that only you or you and a select few colleagues can see) and private signals (e.g. the fact that you have viewed a particular document, even if it’s public). Delve respects SharePoint and Search permissions, so only users who have access to read a document can see that document appear as a result in Delve. Furthermore, details like the documents you view or documents others view are private.
  • Any Android / iOS apps in the pipeline for Delve?
    • Yes but no timeline could be provided yet
  • Not all content (file types) is included in Delve. Any plans for extending the list of file types, and/or list of content sources?
    • PDF, excel, and word file types are included but there is absence of image files and Visio files.
    • Yep, we are planning to add more content sources and signals to the Office Graph on ongoing basis
    • We are working on increasing the content types supported by Delve. We started with an initial list of Office doc types, but we will expand this over time.
  • Delve site has default branding and does not incorporate our corporate branding that is available on Yammer, OneDrive and Sites menu options in top navigation bar?
    • The top Office 365 navigation is now theme able and your theme should be available in Delve as well. Broader theming is something we’ll be looking at in the future.
  • Delve was rolled out to our business tenant yesterday. So far it is showing us trending documents that our co-workers are viewing on SharePoint. Is there a way to block certain areas so we don’t see our co-workers trends in HR searches?
    • You can make those documents not shared using the SharePoint permissions UI, but right now, there’s no feature to exclude documents from Delve but still available to everyone.  read here for more details.
  • Will Outlook be leverage into Delve
    • Outlook as part of Office 365 is already leveraged in Delve.
    • We are considering adding email attachments to Delve.
    • Office Graph is driving scenario for OWA. So appointments and attendee information are only leveraged in delve if it’s in OWA. You can imagine Office Graph providing insights multiple scenarios in the future…if you haven’t already done so check the Office Graph on the blog post from Monday.
  • Does ‘signals from exchange’ refer to email relationships (i.e. who the recipients and senders are)?
    • Yes, and to elaborate, it analyzes the set of people with whom you correspond via email and use this data as a factor to weight your working relationships with your colleagues.
    • The org structure is another factor taken into consideration
  • The 5 people to the left – seems to be right for most people (in terms of the ones with most interactions), but I have seen colleagues, with strange people presented as top 5 people.
    • have a bug where it is showing groups/crawler accounts instead of just people
    • The people on the left aren’t related to them in any way. Known issues MSFT working with no ETA
  • Will Delve work in a hybrid scenario using my On-Premise systems?
    • This is place for partner opportunities! But MSFT is working on a solution to feed on-premises (like exchange on premise) content into Delve, but no timeline can be announced.
    • Plans to release hybrid connector capabilities so that the Office Graph can integrate signals and content from on prem.
  • Any federation plans across multiple tenants?
    • No plans today
  • Delve supports the most common screen readers, high-contrast mode etc aligned with Microsoft policies in this area.
  • Is there a way to limit #delve deployment to some user groups in the company? Just to help company to graduate deploy it
    • An individual user can turn off Delve. This will also control Office Graph as-well.
  • Are you adding Delve results to the search page, or can we see this as an UI opportunity
    • Not to SharePoint enterprise search center but we look at that as an opportunity
  • Item limit for Delve
    • Delve shows up to 36 items in a view. This is the same when you search in the search box.
  • Details to the API Roadmap?
    • Right now you can do graph queries through the SharePoint Search Rest API using “Graph Query Language” as described here: GQL
  • If a user has permission to access a document/list item but the library/list is excluded from search in list settings will the content still display in Delve?
    • Nope, Delve uses the same permissions for search..
  • Do you have plan to return Yammer conversations in any form as Delve results ?
    • It’s something MSFT is actively working on showing the Yammer conversations tied to documents in Delve.
  • Is Delve going to work with Office 365 Pro Plus client or only Office online, and the other question, is it only working based on files saved only in ODFB and SharePoint online?
    • Yes if the document is stored in OneDrive for Business or SharePoint Online then yes the Office Graph will index it
  • What is the best way to introduce Delve within an organization? Are there best practices and change management recommendations?
    • We are working on an email template that Office 365 admins can then send to their users that helps address exactly what you’re asking. It would have info about What, How, Why with links and first steps. This template will be made available to admins via the message center to raise awareness.
    • We, too, plan to incorporate Delve info and insight into the adoption website we currently maintain here: Discover SharePoint  (with near-term plans to focus on broader Office 365 scenarios).

Hope this provides some insights around how Office Graph captures and renders signals. Check back for more details as I dive more into Delve.

Delve Has Arrived

How long have you been patiently waiting for this amazing new search powered app called “Delve”? Days, weeks, months?
The wait is finally over with Microsoft announcing today that it is releasing Delve to office 365 subscribers!

What is Delve?
Delve is a new way to search and discover content with Office graph in the background doing all the heavy lifting.
I talk about it in detail here or Watch the video here.

Release ScheduleFinally Here
The Office blog says, “Delve will roll out to Office 365 customers in phases, first to customers that have elected to receive significant Office 365 service updates at first release, an opt-in program. Following that, Delve will roll out to all Office 365 customers over several months in standard release, the default option for Office 365 customers. We expect Delve to roll out to all eligible Office 365 customers by early 2015. For the Office 365 Business Essentials, Business Premium, Small Business, Small Business Premium, and Midsize Business customers, first release rollout will begin in January 2015.”

Admin Get Started
If you are wondering how to avail this feature, check out the Delve for Admins here.