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Posts Tagged ‘social’

Meet Yammer, Your Answer to Project Collaboration!

Yammer has a full range of features to help you communicate openly and expedite decision making, open new collaboration channels and breakdown email silos. Let’s start looking at our current ways of communicating with our team. A typical project is slated to begin and end with a vision and goal. In order to achieve these, it’s essential to have transparent and effective communication. Throughout the project lifecycle, we engage in numerous communication channels whether they are phone calls, emails, video calls, messenger chats etc. We are so engaged in making the project a success that we end up overseeing the numerous hours spent communicating with internal team or external customers. This is where Yammer steps in. The idea is not to replace each and every channel but to reduce the time spent and make it more effective so you can reach maximum throughput.

Three main reasons why would you consider using Yammer for internal and external collaboration are ease of use, mobile app, and collaborating with external users. Yammer can move your team beyond the hierarchical and glacial-paced decision making that can hobble a project’s progress. You can set up a private Yammer group where your team can conduct online conversations around important project elements; this allows each team member to be part of the decision-making process. To keep things in perspective, I will share a use case from one of my recent customer engagements. Delivery success is measured by how well the deliverables and activities match the agreed upon vision and goal objectives. One of the first sessions in these engagements is the project kick off. This meeting involves all the stakeholders of the project and establishes a sense of common goals and allows us to start understanding each individual. This is where all communication channels are discussed and confirmed and ultimately where Yammer can be introduced.

Today, I’ll share my firsthand experience of using Yammer as a project collaboration platform and showcase its value with a real world use case.

One of the biggest frustrations I face at the start of every project is the ton of emails exchanged, many times with attachments and their different versions end up choking my inbox. This is where Yammer comes to rescue. Follow these three basic steps and you will never go back to traditional ways of project management.

  1. Create an Internal Yammer Group
  2. Create an External Network
  3. Invite Members and Start Sharing

 

1. Your Internal GroupInternalGroup1

This will enable daily communication within our team. Drafts of documents, questions, clarification everything can be posted in the internal group.

  • Tagging People – Helps notify the right individuals and keep the noise from others inbox. All our posts were targeted to the group and at least one team member. This generates a notification for the tagged individual.
  • Tagging Content – Helps to find information when needed most. You’ve got to love the subscription model, and this is where it is most powerful. Subscribe to any topic and you are then fed all conversations around that topic on your home screen.
  • Ask a Question – Every project has issues and gaps and Yammer is your best bet to get those straightened out quickly. We made sure any question that involved more than two individuals is posted in the internal group. You will be amazed at how quick and effective this approach can be.
  • Upload Deliverables for Review – I have yet to meet someone who enjoys receiving multiple versions of documents (and sometimes huge slide decks) in their inbox followed by performing a clean-up activity. We used Yammer to share all project related documents which helped us unclog our inbox and tag the content with topics and people for appropriate notification.

Now, when you are ready with your deliverables, move them over to the external group for sharing. This keeps separation between internal team and customer communications.

2. Create an External NetworkExternalNetwork1

Creating an external network will allow you to have an dedicated collaboration space with the customer.

  • Allows Yammer groups to collaborate on individual project and social needs.
  • Advantage of transparency and a quick communication channel.

 

 

 

ExternalGroup2

When you have an external network setup, go ahead and create a project group. This will enable you to focus all project related conversations inside a group. Add all team members to this group and mark it as “Public” or “Private” based on your needs.

 

3. Don’t forget to add team members and post your first message

Remember there might be few folks on your team who are not familiar or not comfortable with the concept of using Yammer for this purpose. Sharing documents, deliverables and posting questions will all act as an ice breaker. Start with some water cooler talk if nothing else (keep it relevant to your team or project though). Upload files directly to Yammer for sharing across the group. You can upload new versions of documents and let Yammer maintain control over previous versions.

Suggestions:

  • Mark your uploaded content as “official and read only” if you are working on projects in which documents are changed often. The “official and read only” designation is also an effective way to get team members past sticking to their own versions of project documents.
  • Equip your team members with one of Yammer’s mobile apps and they will have always-on channel to team discussions and files. Social collaboration does take a little extra convincing and showcasing but once you get people on board it’s a breeze. Reducing those chunky emails, not having to clear your inbox every now and then, quick response, level of engagement, and ability to search topics and documents makes it a sure shot winner.
  • Use groups to receive feedback and approval on project deliverables by including your stakeholders/sponsors in the “cc” while sharing the posts.

* If you are concerned about compliance and security when uploading documents, no need to worry, you can still use Yammer effectively. In circumstances like those, utilize SharePoint as the document repository and Yammer as the front end for all communications, post links to SharePoint document libraries and start a conversation. Even better, if you are on Office 365, all the group conversations are now integrated with the documents and sites.

Here at Perficient we have utilized Yammer in various scenarios.  Along with our certified customer success managers and admins, we continue to help our customers adopt and roll out  successful social networks. Please add your feedback and share your experience here if you have used this approach.

Could Yammer Supplant Your Intranet?

We see a lot of scenarios where clients are moving their intranets successfully to the Office 365 cloud with SharePoint Online.  This is the easiest, smoothest path to an social intranet on the Microsoft platform, due largely to the ever-closer relationship between Yammer and the rest of the services in Office 365.

That said,there are still plenty of enterprises out there who prefer to either keep their intranet on-premises, or not upgrade / migrate just yet.  Many of those organizations would still like to get their bang for the buck with Yammer, however, and need to figure out a solution for integrating those social features into their on-premises solution.

By far the most common way to accomplish this right now is through the use of the Yammer Embed functionality (or specifically for SharePoint, the Yammer app for SharePoint) to embed specific news feeds on specific sites.  This is easily the most obvious way to “socialize” an on-premises SharePoint intranet with Yammer.

That works, sure.  But it’s not all that elegant.  Too, if you’re using the Yammer app for SharePoint, this approach forces you to go in and update every Yammer feed when they update the app (which is a pain).

A more forward-thinking, less common but emerging approach to a social intranet is to actually use Yammer as the intranet home.

This is an example of truly embracing enterprise social and may require a complete rethink from a lot of organizations as to how they approach an intranet, but it’s the direction things seem to be going.  You make the social network your home, and instead of augmenting informational sites with social feeds, you augment social groups with links to informational sites using Pins and the Info window’s rich text / HTML editor feature.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Think about it.  Here at Perficient, we’re in the midst of rolling out a new platform for time tracking, financials, and other fun line-of-business activity and reporting.  We have both a Yammer group stood up to support that rollout, and a more traditional SharePoint intranet site.

What we’ve found in this scenario is that the Yammer feed has actually supplanted the informational site because it’s a much faster and more responsive way for people to get answers and collaborate.  Links embedded in the Yammer page direct users back to SharePoint for the informational / non-collaborative content they need, but the social discussion and interaction is now the focus.

Of course, Yammer in general resists (i.e., doesn’t allow) any but the most basic customization.  Fonts, styles, navigation etc., are all locked in “as is”.  The only thing you can really change in Yammer is the header atop your page.  That means we lose some control over branding, but gain quite a bit in interaction and employee engagement.  For this use case, it’s a smashing success.

The question then becomes, “Can this approach work for an entire intranet, and not just one use case?”

To some extent, that depends on the users.  At the end of the day, it all depends on where they go when they log on in the morning.  Email?  The intranet?  Or their social network?  Get the ball rolling with enterprise social and people will start skipping over the intranet– it’s almost a given.  Use social to surface intranet content and the line starts to blur… which is a lot closer to where things are going in the cloud than it is to a hodgepodge of on-prem intranet sites with embedded social feeds.

Everything You Need to Know About Delve & Office Graph

Ok, I’ve got to admit I really meant to say “Almost everything you need to know in first Release.”

The more you share, the more you get. Believe in that? Office 365 community does and as a result , this week Microsoft hosted “Delve Yamjam” to coincide with the launch of the new Office 365 product called “Delve”. (If you are new to I highly recommend reading earlier articles here and here to get to know your new friend Delve). Look at a screenshot of Delve from my demo tenant, looks pretty cool, huh?

Delve Img1

Some great questions asked some great thoughts shared. I summarize here for the larger community. Microsoft responses were from Christophe Fiessinger, Kady Dundas, Josh Stickler, Mark Kashman, Cem Aykan and on the phone Ashok Kuppusamy, Stefan Debald, Fredrik Holm, John Toews, and Robin Miller.

  • Which Office 365 business plans includes Delve?
    • Delve is included in the Office 365 E1 – E4 subscription plans (and the corresponding A2 – A4 and G1 – G4 plans for Academic and Government customers respectively)
  • Can I protect data from ever being shown in others Delve results?
    • Yes, Delve only shows documents based on permissions set and inherit those from OneDrive and SharePoint online. Also each card will have a sharing control and “who can see this” option
    • If your folder and contents are not shared with anyone, they will not appear in Delve for anyone. It always respect the permissions set on the items.
  • Which kinds of data is considered “private data”?
    • There’s both the concept of private data (e.g. files that only you or you and a select few colleagues can see) and private signals (e.g. the fact that you have viewed a particular document, even if it’s public). Delve respects SharePoint and Search permissions, so only users who have access to read a document can see that document appear as a result in Delve. Furthermore, details like the documents you view or documents others view are private.
  • Any Android / iOS apps in the pipeline for Delve?
    • Yes but no timeline could be provided yet
  • Not all content (file types) is included in Delve. Any plans for extending the list of file types, and/or list of content sources?
    • PDF, excel, and word file types are included but there is absence of image files and Visio files.
    • Yep, we are planning to add more content sources and signals to the Office Graph on ongoing basis
    • We are working on increasing the content types supported by Delve. We started with an initial list of Office doc types, but we will expand this over time.
  • Delve site has default branding and does not incorporate our corporate branding that is available on Yammer, OneDrive and Sites menu options in top navigation bar?
    • The top Office 365 navigation is now theme able and your theme should be available in Delve as well. Broader theming is something we’ll be looking at in the future.
  • Delve was rolled out to our business tenant yesterday. So far it is showing us trending documents that our co-workers are viewing on SharePoint. Is there a way to block certain areas so we don’t see our co-workers trends in HR searches?
    • You can make those documents not shared using the SharePoint permissions UI, but right now, there’s no feature to exclude documents from Delve but still available to everyone.  read here for more details.
  • Will Outlook be leverage into Delve
    • Outlook as part of Office 365 is already leveraged in Delve.
    • We are considering adding email attachments to Delve.
    • Office Graph is driving scenario for OWA. So appointments and attendee information are only leveraged in delve if it’s in OWA. You can imagine Office Graph providing insights multiple scenarios in the future…if you haven’t already done so check the Office Graph on the blog post from Monday.
  • Does ‘signals from exchange’ refer to email relationships (i.e. who the recipients and senders are)?
    • Yes, and to elaborate, it analyzes the set of people with whom you correspond via email and use this data as a factor to weight your working relationships with your colleagues.
    • The org structure is another factor taken into consideration
  • The 5 people to the left – seems to be right for most people (in terms of the ones with most interactions), but I have seen colleagues, with strange people presented as top 5 people.
    • have a bug where it is showing groups/crawler accounts instead of just people
    • The people on the left aren’t related to them in any way. Known issues MSFT working with no ETA
  • Will Delve work in a hybrid scenario using my On-Premise systems?
    • This is place for partner opportunities! But MSFT is working on a solution to feed on-premises (like exchange on premise) content into Delve, but no timeline can be announced.
    • Plans to release hybrid connector capabilities so that the Office Graph can integrate signals and content from on prem.
  • Any federation plans across multiple tenants?
    • No plans today
  • Delve supports the most common screen readers, high-contrast mode etc aligned with Microsoft policies in this area.
  • Is there a way to limit #delve deployment to some user groups in the company? Just to help company to graduate deploy it
    • An individual user can turn off Delve. This will also control Office Graph as-well.
  • Are you adding Delve results to the search page, or can we see this as an UI opportunity
    • Not to SharePoint enterprise search center but we look at that as an opportunity
  • Item limit for Delve
    • Delve shows up to 36 items in a view. This is the same when you search in the search box.
  • Details to the API Roadmap?
    • Right now you can do graph queries through the SharePoint Search Rest API using “Graph Query Language” as described here: GQL
  • If a user has permission to access a document/list item but the library/list is excluded from search in list settings will the content still display in Delve?
    • Nope, Delve uses the same permissions for search..
  • Do you have plan to return Yammer conversations in any form as Delve results ?
    • It’s something MSFT is actively working on showing the Yammer conversations tied to documents in Delve.
  • Is Delve going to work with Office 365 Pro Plus client or only Office online, and the other question, is it only working based on files saved only in ODFB and SharePoint online?
    • Yes if the document is stored in OneDrive for Business or SharePoint Online then yes the Office Graph will index it
  • What is the best way to introduce Delve within an organization? Are there best practices and change management recommendations?
    • We are working on an email template that Office 365 admins can then send to their users that helps address exactly what you’re asking. It would have info about What, How, Why with links and first steps. This template will be made available to admins via the message center to raise awareness.
    • We, too, plan to incorporate Delve info and insight into the adoption website we currently maintain here: Discover SharePoint  (with near-term plans to focus on broader Office 365 scenarios).

Hope this provides some insights around how Office Graph captures and renders signals. Check back for more details as I dive more into Delve.

Office 365 pushes Microsoft atop Gartner’s Social Magic Quadrant

Microsoft position as a Leader in Gartner’s 2014 Magic Quadrant for Social Software in the Workplace has moved to the top. Read the rest of this post »

SharePoint Online Retires Tags and Notes

As Microsoft continues to blend and expand Yammer capabilities across the platform, they have retired Tags and Notes in SharePoint Online.

Key factor to note is that users can no longer create create or access existing tags or notes. The only option is for SharePoint Online admins to export all existing tags and notes via an archived csv files, from the SharePoint admin center. Also, for those using this feature, the webparts will start showing up blank.

Tags-Notes

Tags and Note UX in SharePoint 2013

Below is the table of  how this will affect users :

Item
Change
Tags & Notes button on ribbonStill visible but disabled.
Note Board and Tag Cloud web parts in the web part galleryStill visible and enabled. The web parts will show up as blank when added to a page.
Note Board and Tag Cloud web parts embedded in a pagePage will display a blank space in the area previously occupied by the web parts. Edit the page to remove the web parts.
Social tagsSocial tags will no longer appear in the tags refiner. The refiner will still display hashtags.
Tags and notes listed on personal sitesThe area that previously listed tags and notes will be blank.

Enterprise Social and its Three Most Dangerous Myths

Enterprise social.  It’s not the greatest thing since sliced bread (The Beatles, frozen custard and computer-generated animation all make stronger cases for that title) but lately it seems like it’s close.  That said, for all of its growing popularity, our experience tells us that a good deal of what people believe about social networks– and how to get users engaged on them– is flat-out wrong.

sliced_breadAfter a summer so busy that I missed my July deadline, this morning I published a new article on CMSWire addressing three of enterprise social’s most dangerous myths head-on.  Check it out and learn why…

  • A single network might not be your best bet for adoption…
  • #ESN rollouts aren’t like any other new application, and…
  • Some users will simply never adopt them, no matter what you do.

Interested in continuing the conversation?  I’ll be unofficially representing Perficient (which cannot be held responsible for any comparisons I make between Yammer and Game of Thrones) in CMSWire’s upcoming TweetJam (yes, that’s a thing) on this month’s editorial focus “What does working like a network look like in practice?” The Tweet Jam will take place on Wednesday, August 20 at 1pm ET/ 10am PT.  You can find me on Twitter at @richOthewood; follow @CMSWire for TweetJam details and the #official #hashtag to follow.

Will Enterprise Collaboration Drive Digital Transformation?

CIO.com has an article titled, “Enterprise Collaboration Will Drive Digital Transformation“.  Perhaps a more descriptive but longer title would be, “Digital Transformation Will Happen But Those Who Succeed Will Collaborate Across The Enterprise”  It’s not the catchiest title of course.  However, it highlights how to make any transformation successful.  The author, Matt Kapko, notes

“The CIO is more important than ever before,” says Solis. Instead of working against a technology roadmap, CIOs are now focusing on organizational processes and objectives that matter more to different types of customers and employees.

Now this is in CIO Magazine so it’s from a CIO perspective.  But the accompanying graphic from Alitimeter group tells you something

Who is the Executive Champion?

Who is the Executive Champion?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CMO’s and CEO’s are driving digital transformation more than CIO’s.  That more than anything tells you that even though we are talking about digital transformation, it’s not just about the technology.  Matt Kapko has it right when he says that technology has to be an enabler and that it needs to be aligned with a bigger mission.

I especially like the Sephora example in the article.

Companies like Sephora are making this transformation by grouping every employee that touches a digital customer into a single team. Social media, customer service, sales, support and other functions are now equally equipped, informed and capable of meeting various customer needs.

“It all started with this greater intent to recognize that the digital customer is different than solving any one of these problems alone. To the customer we’re one brand, so we should act like it internally,” explains Solis.

I think that nails it on the head and brings enterprise collaboration into focus.  Enterprise Collaboration tools purport to break down silos and enable people across an organization find each other and get work done.   When you say digital transformation and customer in one sentence then, like Sephora, you have to cut across multiple organizations.

Read the whole article for other interesting graphics and information.

Developing for Office 365 and SharePoint

Recently I participated in a Microsoft developer discussion on the Yammer Network where some great ideas were shared. I am re posting a summary of the session posted in that group here for everyone’s benefit

——————————–

Overview: Microsoft responses to questions are provided by Chris Johnson, Sonya Koptyev, Jeremy Thake, Dorrene Brown, Mauricio Ordonez, Brian Jones, Ricky Kirkham, Christophe Fiessinger, Jeremy Chapman, Alister Spiers, and 365 IT Pro Team as well as MVP Juan Carlos Gonzalez Martin.
 

FUTURE PLANS
Q: When will we see the O365 APIs move out of preview? When will we see the O365 APIs move out of preview?
A: We’re aiming for end of this calendar year. We’re getting a bunch of great feedback and have a few partners building solutions that have helped us identify some additional work we’d like to get in. We will have a public roadmap soon that we will be keeping up to date to help give people a heads up on when developer related features will be coming.

Q: Are there any plans in the SharePoint roadmap for an analytics API about user actions (like Usage or Audit data for SharePoint On-Prem)?
A: It is something that our Information Management team are working on. This is obviously challenging from a multi-tenant perspective due to the nature of where we have come from historically with the SharePoint platform

Q: Is there is any plans for Lync online API so we can schedule and add people to meetings from our custom application? 
A: We are working to expand our APIs across the suite, but we don’t have any announcements around the Lync Online APIs at this time.
 
Q: Can you please provide a little more insight around the plans for auto versus provider hosted apps and what is going to happen to Cloud Business Apps (light switch / html)? I understand provider hoist is the current guidance but I’d like to understand what the path will be so we can make some good architectural and strategic decisions for our apps in the near future – 3-6 months timeframe. We currently create, and have a need for small, dedicated task oriented apps that interact between Office 365 and SQL Azure.
A: The Auto-hosted apps preview program is closed (http://blogs.office.com/2014/05/16/update-on-autohosted-apps-preview-program and we will be allowing the apps to run until close to the end of the year. The guidance is to convert your auto-hosted apps (if you have any) to provider-hosted. That is the preferred app deployment model today. We cannot comment on the CBAs but can pull in the right folks to answer your questions around CBAs.

Q2: Are you working on a replacement for Autohosted Apps? Autohosted Apps were a really powerful App Type for creating and deploying small Apps without having to worry about deploying them in Azure.
A2: We heard from developers that they wanted to have full access to Azure, and so as we announced in the blog post we will continue to work with the Visual Studio team to continue to simplify and streamline the deploy process into Azure.

Q: Is there a plan to enhance the APIs available for administrative activies such as managing domains/DNS entries or modify Exchange/Lync/Sharepoint settings via APIs?
A: Our approach is to have management APIs via PowerShell + the remote APIs via REST/CSOM. We don’t currently have anything to share about new APIs coming to PowerShell about those specific things. We’re always looking to improve what can be automated! The big focus has been to make it easier through poweshell cmdlets… check them out on TechNet – http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn194107.aspx

Q: Are there any plans to be more transparent about updates to the UI? Given that our development is focused on a client side API, any changes to the standard HTML can immediately render our solutions broken. For example — the top navigation bar’s text color recently changed. If my branding had used that color for the background color, the text would have been invisible. Even “non-disruptive” changes can be disruptive.
A: There is work in progress to be more transparent with our roadmap where we will share changes such as the user experience changes along with new and changed APIs.

The nature of us running a service now is that we are continually improving the user experience. With SharePoint On-Premises the user experience has changed between Cumulative Updates, Service Packs and major releases. As a SharePoint developer we have always had to manage this balance, taking a dependency from your code on the UI is a fragile one due to the frequency of change and we would recommend you avoid it at all costs.

With regards to the scenario you provided around the top navigation bar text color recently changing…the Theme approach is fully supported. I do agree that it is unfortunate that the text became invisible. We are working on some new features to improve this experience, but are not quite ready to disclose them

Q: Are there plans to make it easier for public facing and publishing sites to be Responsive ready? What can we look forward to?
A: Have you checked out this post about responsive web design in SharePoint? http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sharepointdev/archive/2013/04/01/implementing-your-responsive-designs-on-sharepoint-2013.aspx
Also, you can find additional information about designing public facing sites here: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-sharepoint-online-enterprise-help/public-website-faq-HA104135026.aspx#_Toc383417646

Q: CRM now supports multiple instances within a single Office 365 tenant. Will SharePoint receive this same capability in the future so that we can better manage Development and QA instances?
A: Currently SharePoint has the capability of creating different Site Collections in the same tenancy which is how some handle dev/QA areas to keep things separate. However, others choose to create an entirely separate tenancy to keep things separate.

In your case what are you looking for isolation of? Sites, User profiles? Mailboxes? All of the above? Keen to hear more about what you are looking for. Please log it on UserVoice: http://officespdev.uservoice.com/

Q: A request that we get from Office365 customers is hiding specific content from the suite bar. Are there any plans to implement customizing and hiding content? This would need to be consistent across all Office365 Services. 
A: We’ve also heard several times that customizing the suite bar is something that users want as well. While we aren’t quite ready to share our thinking just yet, this is something we are thinking about at this time.
 
APIs 
Q: How much change should we expect moving from the Preview APIs to the Production APIs?
How much notice will we get when this happens to make sure we can make adjustments in our code?
A: We don’t anticipate huge changes in the O365 APIs moving from preview to production. There will be changes to the APIs while they are still in preview, but we’ll make sure to let everyone know in advance. We are currently working on a 30-60-90 day roadmap for the public that will show people what will be changing in the near future.
 
Q: In the preview Office 365 Files Rest API what is the reasoning behind limiting file copy and move operations to only within the same document library? This really limits the usefulness of those operations and is less functionality than what is in the existing SharePoint web endpoints.
A: No reason other than we haven’t implemented the feature yet :) The Files APIs are still in preview mode, and while we can’t share the exact improvements we will be making this is definitely a good idea. Can you add this feature request to our UserVoice (aka.ms/officedevfeedback) so we can get it on our backlog?

Q: What is the relationship between the O365 APIs (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/office/dn605893) and SharePoint apps intended for SharePoint Online? Are SP apps going to be replaced (eventually) by the O365 APIs? If not, what scenarios are appropriate for SP Apps, but not for O365 APIs, and vice versa?
A: No, they are not replacing Apps for SharePoint. The way we see is that the Apps are the contextual experience of surfacing your customization into SharePoint and Office. Such as App Parts, Ribbon Custom Actions, List Item Block Actions in SharePoint or Read/Write Compose in Outlook and Content App in PowerPoint.

The Office 365 APIs are your way of reaching into the services (Calendar, Mail, Contacts, OneDrive for Business, SharePoint All Sites) from your standalone web applications or mobile applications.We see these two complementing each other to deliver your business solutions. We will be sharing more soon on this direction and strategy.

Q: From my SharePoint site can I call my custom for example WebAPI endpoint and use OAuth to authorize this call on the backend? I want to call external backend from JavaScript in my SharePoint site and just know the caller from my backend I don’t want to call back to SharePoint I will just get data from my backend and send it to the caller. 
A: We don’t think you can use the context token in that way. There’s no way to obtain a context token programmatically. What we would suggest for these JavaScript scenarios is that your WebAPI use an Auth cookie that gets sent in response to the initial context token.

GENERAL QUESTIONS AND FUNCTIONALITY 
Q: When will we get to know more about the Discovery Service? We work in integration, and knowing what’s out there instead of having to search for it would be extraordinarily helpful.
A:The Discovery Service allows applications to find the specific endpoint location for resources. For example, when a user signs into an application it can call the discovery service to determine URL of the user’s OneDrive. This saves the user from having to manually type in the URL. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/dn605898(v=office.15).aspx

Q: I’ve been having a lot of trouble figuring out leverage Office Web Apps as a provider hosted app. What’s the best path for third party companies wanting to give users the best web experience possible?
Is it possible to use Office Web Apps with a client dropbox account? Feed them a byte[] or some such action?
A: If the files are stored in O365, then you should be able to use the Web Apps to render the files. If the files are in dropbox, you’d need to first get them into the user’s OneDrive for business folder, and the Web Apps would then render them.

Q: What is the relationship of the O365 Common Consent Framework (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/dn605895(v=of…) to SharePoint apps? Assuming the app is targeted only for SharePoint Online, is the ComCon Framework and alternative to the existing ACS/OAuth system for SP app developers? Is it meant to replace the existing system?
A: The Common Consent Framework allows applications to access multiple services. Today the set of services supported by common consent includes SharePoint, Exchange, and the directory. In contrast, SharePoint app authorization model allows access solely to SharePoint resources. At SharePoint Conference 2014 we announced our direction is to converge these two models.
Right now you can actually already call the CSOM and REST APIs if your app asks for at least READ permissions that the user consents to. You can pass the Auth Bearer token as you make calls to both those APIs.

Q2: How would you use CSOM in an O365 APP? Would you use a token to establish a ClientContext?
A2: Yes, you can use CSOM completely out of SharePoint…there is a post of Kirk Evans where he shows how to create a Timer Job where you can see this idea.http://blogs.msdn.com/b/kaevans/archive/2014/03/02/building-a-sharepoint-app-as-a-timer-job.aspx
The Microsoft team is also working on getting out some simple blogs posts dealing with this particular subject.

Q: When developing Apps for Office 365 and the App Catalog: we may want to update our app from time to time. What resources are there to learn the best way to do this and could this potentially translate to On-Prem app updates? 
A: Ricky Kirkham did an amazing session on this at SharePoint Conference http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/SharePoint-Conference/2014/SPC425. Due to the app model not sitting on the SharePoint Server, the good news is that IISRESETs are not required that would impact the operational uptime of the SharePoint server.
There are naturally strategies just like any web applications of releasing new versions of your web app into production still. But it does not impact your SharePoint SLA now, just your app. We have several topics on MSDN about updating SP apps. The top node is: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/fp179904%28v=office.15%29.aspx. It is not necessary to stop SharePoint to update an app. Only the app itself is inaccessible while the update is running.

Q: Why is the Recycle method not exposed on SP.Web in CSOM? In order to recycle a web rather than delete it. I only see DeleteObject exposed where other objects such as SP.List have a Recycle method.
A: That would be a great one to add to user voice, and we can take a look at it. http://officespdev.uservoice.com

Q: Tenancy scope app can’t install app part. How I can create the concept of app stabling to my site and run code in the host web without needing to install an app and add my app part to the host web?
A: If it is a scenario when a user launches the home page of the host web and you want to execute some code and render something on the page,right now you would need to add the App to every Site where you wanted the App Part.
Right now you can’t automatically add the App Part to a page, we have an engineer investigating this scenario right now. In the future we intend on improving this scenario of deploying apps at a tenant level. If you just want to execute code against multiple host webs, have you can build a Standalone Web Application or Mobile Application that calls the Office 365 APIs.
 
Q: How to deal with the announcement of discontinuation of InfoPath in SharePoint? Is there any guidance or migration path?
A: Customers can still use InfoPath until 2023. We plan to release a replacement (side by side for now) with the SharePoint form customization technology, currently codenamed “FoSL” later this summer. We are also working actively on vNext technologies for other scenarios, and we will provide more details later this year, closer to Q4. http://blogs.office.com/2014/01/31/update-on-infopath-and-sharepoint-forms

Q2: Regarding the 2023 date… will this include InfoPath Forms Services or just InfoPath Desktop Client? Dates this far in the future would certainly impact a client’s decision.
A2: InfoPath Desktop Client will continue to be supported through 2023. InfoPath Forms Services in on-prem deployments will also continue to be supported until 2023. InfoPath Forms Services in SharePoint Online (Office 365) will be maintained until the next on-premises release of SharePoint. We will provide a year’s notice (via blog post) before turning off IPFS in the service.

Q: Will it be possible (or is it already possible) to use Word Online, Excel Online, etc from SharePoint Online as a drop in replacement for textarea/ckeditor html-fields in .Net/Azure web applications?
A: We currently have the ability to drop a document on a page and use Word Online to view it. However, we don’t have the ability to just use it as a generic rich text editing control like you would with the radEditor for example.

Q2: When you say drop a document on a page, do you mean a web page that is not within SharePoint Online (like a regular MVC-web application pages (for example a cshtml-page))? And does this solution require the users to login to SharePoint online also?
A2: Yes, that’s right. Auth depends on where the document sits. If it’s in Office 365, then yes, they would need to authenticate. You can also do the same with documents in OneDrive.

 

 

Source: Yammer IT Pro

Updates on SharePoint and Yammer SKUs

SharePoint SKU Retirement

July 1st, the following SKUs will be retired:

  • SharePoint Plan 1 w/ Yammer
  • SharePoint Plan 2 w/ Yammer
  • Office Online w/ SharePoint Plan 1
  • Office Online w/ SharePoint Plan 1

Updates on SharePoint and Yammer SKUsThis retirement aligns with Microsoft’s previous announcement of OneDrive for Business and the broader SKU strategy of eliminating mini-suites. More information on this announcement will be forthcoming.

 

Yammer: Free with A and M SKUs 

Starting June 16th, Yammer capability will be included in A and M SKU. Access will roll out to existing and new customers in the coming weeks.

More information on this rollout will be announced shortly.

 

SharePoint Plan 1/2 and Yammer Standalone Coming to Open

Starting August 1st, SharePoint Plan 1, SharePoint Plan 2, and Yammer Enterprise Standalone will be available in Open.

These SKUs will appear on the July 1st Pricelist Preview and the August 1st Pricelist.

 

Roundup: Enterprise Social ROI, External Governance in Yammer

It’s been a busy couple of weeks here at the office.  Besides hopping from LA to NYC to Chicago to work with various and sundry eye-catching clients, we’ve been turning out essays on a couple of hot topics:

  • Roundup: Enterprise Social ROI, External Governance in YammerROI (Return On Investment) as provided by Enterprise Social Networks
  • Governance in Yammer, specifically External Networks

In the first instance, we’ve got an article up over at CMSWire discussing the futility of using ROI as a case for investing in enterprise social.  The wiser course by far is to leverage one of the freemium networks available (and of course, I’m personally partial to Yammer– the best one out there) and let it build value within your organization first.  That basically makes the case for you.

The second piece covers Yammer directly, and specifically goes into the design of Usage Policies for Yammer’s External Networks.  These are a great tool for communicating and collaborating with clients, vendors and partners– so long as you design a binding Usage Policy with several key guidelines in mind.  In our post on ViewDo Labs’ enterprise social blog, we tell you what those guidelines are.

Curious?  I hope so!  Check out the latest and let us know what you think.