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Posts Tagged ‘SharePoint’

Set up Document ID prefix in SharePoint 2013 programmatically

While it is simple to set the prefix of Document ID Service in SharePoint 2013 manually, it’s less straightforward if you are looking to set it up programmatically (but still fairly simple once you know how). If you’ve been wondering how to do this correctly, last week, Perficient’s Peng Zhao wrote a blog post that walks through the necessary steps.

This post introduces you to a correct way to set up Document ID Prefix in SharePoint 2013. Immediately after you kick off the timer jobs for Document ID service in this approach, all of your documents under the new site will show up with correct prefix.

We have recently rolled out a web template based on our team site template. It requires you to set the prefix of Document ID service when the user is creating a site with the web template. It is simple if you can do it manually in the “site settings>>Document Id Settings” like this:

SharePoint2013 Document ID Settings

If you plan to do it programmatically, it is a different story. The articles or blogs I searched on the Internet demonstrate that the following will do the trick:

SharePoint2013 Document ID Settings by web properties

It sets the root web property “docid_settings_ui”. It also sets the prefix value on the Document ID Settings page as if it were set manually. If you go to the settings page, the prefix string shows up there; nothing seems wrong. But after you kick off your timer jobs for Document ID service, you will find all your documents never get the new prefix.

The CORRECT way to set the document id prefix should be like this:

SharePoint2013 Document ID Settings by server side model

Neat and simple, right?

In this way, right after you kick off the timer jobs for Document ID service, all your documents under the new site will show up with correct prefix.

 

Thanks Peng Zhao and Matt Connolly for sharing this tip!

Perficient’s Top 5 Yammer Blog Posts of 2014

In another 12 hours or so, topfivethose of us on the east coast will be watching the ball drop (mainly on television, but perhaps a few of the Perficient folks local to NYC are planning to brave the cold and crowds). Either way, we’ll be celebrating with family and friends as we ring in the New Year. New Year’s Eve is certainly a social occasion, so I thought I’d wrap up 2014 with a summary of the best enterprise social posts that were published throughout the year.

Since our enterprise social network of choice is Yammer (both for our customers and internally, where we’ve moved from predominately communicating via email to having conversations in Yammer whenever possible), here are the top five blog posts on all things Yammer:

Yammer – DirSync or AD FS (SSO) or Both?
There’s a lot to think about when planning your Enterprise Yammer implementation. How will I get users into Yammer? How will users login to Yammer? Which password will they use? How will users who leave my organization be handled in Yammer? What software do I really need to implement? In this post, Joe Crabtree discusses Yammer DirSync and SSO. SSO in Yammer is a generalized term, as any SSO provider can be connected with Yammer. He focuses specifically on AD FS, as that is Microsoft’s SSO software.

Is Your SharePoint Ready for Yammer?
In this post, Vaibhav Mathur explains, if your organization is experiencing rapid growth or you simply need better collaboration, you ought to take a hard look at enterprise social. Microsoft has clearly stated that they believe the future of social collaboration to be in the cloud, and are making most of their investments in cloud-based features within Yammer and Office 365. As a result, our customers are moving to Yammer as their social platform to enhance their social collaboration practice. Vaibhav discusses the one concern he’s been been hearing from lot of organizations, and that concerns centers around making this transition – from native SharePoint social to Yammer. He talks about how to make the shift, and how to know if Yammer will be of value.

Read the rest of this post »

Perficient’s Top 5 SharePoint Blog Posts of 2014

As 2014 comes to a close, we’re taking a look at our most popular blog posts of the year. Here are the top five SharePoint related posts, in no particular order:top-5

SPC 2014 Roadmap Updates – SharePoint 2015 Announced!
While attending SharePoint Conference 2014, Joe Crabtree summarized Microsoft’s goals for Office, which Jared Spataro shared during his keynote speech. With the cloud being king, Joe goes on to explain what these changes mean for on-premises customers, and assures folks who plan to stay on premises – it’s okay.

SharePoint 2013 Search: JavaScript CSOM Primer
With the rise of SharePoint Online, custom search solutions through JavaScript have become a staple of the development work done for clients. While a lot of your search basics can be handled through simple modification of Display Templates, the opportunity still arises when you need to do something truly custom with your search code. In this post, Will Tseng reviews the basics, and then takes it a little deeper to give you more control over your queries and results returned.

 SharePoint Hybrid Architectures Introduction
Hybrid SharePoint environments combine deployments of SharePoint on premises with SharePoint Online. The hybrid environments enable organizations to realize a higher degree of flexibility than forcing a choice between either an on-premises or cloud model. The goal of any hybridization is to leverage the strengths of both parts, while minimizing the components’ weaknesses. Here, Joe Crabtree walks through some of the terminology and explains the different options. Read the rest of this post »

Video How-To’s in Office 365

Video Portal was announced back in November with initial push to “first release” customers and a global deployment available by early 2015. This portal powered by Azure Media Services provides adaptive streaming optimized for video playback for the device it’s being viewed on. Leveraging Office Graph, simple drag and drop interface, discover ability across enterprise search and Delve, integration with yammer conversations, and sharing capabilities on mobile makes this an intuitive and engaging knowledge management add in.

Below is a summary of Video Q&A with Microsoft team, MVPs, and community members:

Why does Office 365 Video need Flash installed?

Microsoft is working to add HTML5 video playback support in a future update. This will remove the current Flash dependency. For the initial release, we prioritized security of the videos’ playback stream. We are working with Azure Media Services on new player and detection tech that can get the right player (native, HTML5, or flash) and the right stream from Azure media services, so that we offer both adaptive streaming and security on latest mobile devices and browsers. For native iPhone app, we are using Azure Media Service SDK to support HLS. Browser playback doesn’t work currently for mobile devices because of flash. Read the rest of this post »

Dream Team 2014: Connecting Salesforce and SharePoint

By now, it’s old news that Salesforce is connecting to files stored in Microsoft’s SharePoint Online service, the portals-and-collaboration piece of Office 365.  The official announcement may have been made this morning, but it hit the channel months ago and was unveiled with much fanfare when  it was previewed at Dreamforce 2014 this fall.  Since then, our Perficient team has been doing a lot of thinking about this integration, how and when to use it, and what it means.

Configuring Files Connect to Use Documents From SharePoint

One of the values of having award-winning national practices for both the Salesforce and Microsoft platforms is the chance to work with talented colleagues across technology stacks.  The result was this case study by Bob Graham, which gives a great overview of how we used Files Connect from Salesforce to access documents stored in SharePoint Online.  After collaborating with peers in our Salesforce team, Bob took the time to write this helpful piece up.  In it, he walks you through the steps he took to plan, connect, and ultimately leverage files stored in SharePoint within the Salesforce user experience.  It really is as easy as it looks.

The Greater Implications

“Okay, Perficient,” you might say now, “that’s how you make it work– but what does it mean?”  The obvious answer is the surprising amount of collaboration being shown between the direct actors engaged here– Microsoft and Salesforce– and that’s covered well over at TechCrunch.  It’s fascinating that of all the cloud-based file systems Salesforce could have partnered with for this, the first one in the line was actually Microsoft.

In a macro sense, it’s perfectly rational– the world is growing smaller and more connected, and the days of the one-vendor ecosystem are long dead.  Sure, Microsoft has a competing CRM platform (Dynamics) and Salesforce has its own portal solution (Communities), but as much as anything, this announcement is an acknowledgement that neither company is the market leader in those secondary spaces.  This is two giants connecting like to like– the dominant platforms for CRM and file-sharing, respectively– and making it easier for customers to choose best-of-breed cloud solutions over monolithic enterprise architectures focused on vendor rationalization.

That’s kind of a big deal, wouldn’t you say?

Site Mailbox – A New Way to Collaborate

What’s a Site Mailbox?
Site Mailboxes provide a consolidated view of site content stored within SharePoint and Exchange from within Microsoft Outlook. Site Mailboxes help team members share and archive important emails related to a specific subject, instead of losing those emails in individuals’ inboxes. It can be especially helpful resources for new team members who need to get up to speed quickly on an subject’s history. Oftentimes, emails stored in Site Mailboxes can provide the insight into why past decisions were made and offer context for future decisions.

How is it different from Exchange mailbox?
Site Mailbox doesn’t allow to see documents in outlook, only sync your site document libraries in Outlook and easily share documents with your team…however you can sync a document library in Outlook and see the documents there in preview mode. You will not be able to add the Team Site mailbox to your Outlook desktop client.

How does Site mailbox help you in increasing Productivity?
One of the strong features of Site Mailboxes is the fact that the same functionality exists in both the browser (through SharePoint) and in Outlook. In addition to checking a Site Mailbox through SharePoint to review emails, Site Mailboxes are also available in Outlook 2013 as an additional folder that will display both emails and documents from the SharePoint site.

Site Mailboxes provide users a way to work naturally in their Information Worker client apps, whether that be Outlook or SharePoint.  The content is kept where it belongs. Exchange stores the email-based content, offering users with the same message view for email conversations that they use every day for their own mailboxes.  Meanwhile, SharePoint stores the Office files, bringing co-authoring and versioning to the table.  Compliance policies are applied to all content behind the scenes. Attachments sent to a Site Mailbox are stored and indexed for search in SharePoint allowing users to manage content appropriately across individual team sites and allows for collaboration using Office web apps. Site Mailboxes are also managed by Exchange and easily accessible by Outlook users.

Before you plan site mailboxes keep in mind that:

  • Lifecycle Retention policies can be applied at a Site Mailbox level behind the scenes.
  • Site Mailboxes can be part of eDiscovery Search Scopes.
  • Email content is retained within Microsoft Exchange while documents are retained within SharePoint.
  • In order to include the email as part of a workflow or add metadata columns to it you can drag and drop it directly to a Document Library.
  • Maximum of 10 Site Mailboxes can be added to Outlook

Enough of the talk, let’s see it in action now!

  • Navigate to your team site

mailbox1

 

  • Click on “Mailbox” on the left navigationmailbox2
  • Open email attachment

mailbox3

  •  Hit Edit and Reply and you don’t have to open the PowerPoint in another program or save another copy locally only to re-attach it to her reply. Also, if there was important information in the email she needed to reference, this side-by-side view lets her work on the presentation without having to click back and forth to the email.

mailbox4

 

 

  • Inline email and editing

mailbox5

 

  • With this new information in mind, you now click on your team site in the navigation bar in Outlook Online to return to the site to continue your investigation.

mailbox6

 

 

 

 

 

Mac Solution for OneDrive For Business

I was recently involved in a discussion about the capabilities of OneDrive for Business for Mac, with my co-worker, Michael Toole. One of his customers was in the process of migrating network shares over to SharePoint. Majority of their user base was on Mac, and had very little experience with the web UI’s, so OneDrive sounded like a default choice for syncing their files to local machine.

In this post, I share our experience and findings for a quick and easy way to address the sync problems on Mac (I’ll share the credit for this post with Michael).

Currently OneDrive for Business does not have a sync client for Mac. It’s on the roadmap for later this year or early 2015 although expect it to be released with limited functionality such as only personal site sync (no team site). In the meantime there are few third party apps which does the same. There is an app currently available in the iTunes app store but only works if you have a SharePoint Online or qualifying Office 365 business subscription. Else, look at using Microsoft Document Connection for Mac.

macdc1

This allows you to connect the libraries to your Mac in a very similar way as the windows explorer view on Windows. Although document connection does not support offline access.

macdc2

To get around that limitation, download files to the local device. When the Mac OS is offline, you’ll be able to make any changes using the local Office applications. Once the Mac has a network connection, saving the updated documents to the Document Connection is available. It’ll also respect your check in and check out (read as exclusive check out). So, check out your document while you are online. Make changes while offline, and then check in back to the library when connected. Items also cannot be saved directly to OneDrive for Business through Document Connection. Newly created files on the Mac need to be stored locally and then uploaded to the system.

Spread out your files across multiple document libraries instead of folders in the same location. OneDrive for Business does not allow specific folder sync, but do allow sync across multiple libraries. In short try to go for flat structure across multiple libraries rather than the traditional folder structure.

It’s not the most convenient way when compared to windows, but might be the best way until the public beta for OneDrive for Mac releases next year.

Expanding Data Loss Prevention Across Office 365

Continuing from my previous post on Information Rights Management (IRM), today we will focus our discussion at yet another security feature which is essentially part of customer controls, known as Data Loss Prevention aka DLP.

DLP provides users with policy tips and detects sensitive information in the context of communication. DLP was first rolled out in Exchange and Outlook and then expanded into Outlook Web App (OWA). The only problem was that email is not the only way to share information. A ton of information in this digital age is shared via documents and keeping that in mind, DLP was expanded into SharePoint Online (SPO) and OneDrive for Business (ODFB). Until now eDiscovery allowed us to search sensitive content across SharePoint and OneDrive and now policy actions (restrict and block access) and email notifications are also being introduced.

Source: blogs.office.com

Source: blogs.office.com

With the advent of Office 365, the Microsoft community has become increasingly collaborative in nature, and product teams are now more agile and communicative in their approach than ever before. Building on that approach, recently Microsoft conducted a yamjam around DLP features. Some great scenarios, concerns, and solutions were exchanged. Here is my attempt to capture and summarize that for you.

—————————————————————————

Q: Will DLP be a supplement or replacement to IRM and auditing mechanisms in SharePoint? And in what way will it supplement to IRM and or auditing.

A: DLP is a great supplement for IRM today. Both of these functionalities work seamlessly in Exchange and we are extending that same experience for SPO/ODFB

Q: Will DLP have effect on the content that is shown, or not shown, in Delve

A: That is absolutely our vision. Delve adheres to the user permissions set by your admins and end users, and we will respect the same when it comes to DLP.

Q: Will DLP be a part of the announced Dropbox partnership? Extending to Dropbox for business

A: Currently DLP functionalities are planned only for ODFB/SPO and not Dropbox.

Q: Will DLP be able to enforce IRM on documents that match a policy? 

A: That is definitely in our plans and you can expect us to release that in the service in early 2015

Q: If I want to make sure my policy is enforced on all content all users should have a sufficient license?

A: Yes, you need as many DLP licenses as the number of users. DLP is licensed on per user basis.

Q: How can we protect documents that contain trade secrets or company plans from being uploaded to OneDrive and then downloaded to home computers? These are random documents that may not have specific information to search for. What is to keep users from uploading a mass amount of documents and then downloading them at home?

A: The next level is to apply Rights Management Service (RMS) policies for all content that lands in that area. You can further protect using IRM from within the client and establish a further depth of what can/can’t be done, and possibly further restrict who. Next up is setting policy rules with #dlp that again help to inform and enforce actions that are and are not allowed. In the future we’ll have additional tools via MDM to help protect and reclaim/delete content that can no longer be on devices. Additionally, we’re planning auditing and reporting capabilities so admins can run reports to understand better how content is being used (shared, modified, viewed, etc.).

Q: Is OneDrive for Business a supported application by Azure RMS?

A:  IRM works today for documents on ODFBso yes, Azure RMS works for OneDrive for business. There are some fixes we are making for IRM protected libraries so that it syncs seamlessly just like any other library

Q: ODFB Management : For ODFB and IRM, it seems to be cumbersome to turn on IRM and with certain policy settings like “Allow users to print”. Plus, it does not seem to reference centralized IRM policies like you would expect with Azure RMS because you just name your own policy and do not select from a dropdown list. Is this because IRM on ODFB is not really supported by Azure RMS yet? And is this expected to change sometime soon?

A: ODFB is certainly covered, and is a manual process today from the scope of an audit or configuration of IRM. The concern you have is valid and is something the teams are aware of for auditing, eDiscovery, DLP scenarios. We don’t have timing to share, but we do want to treat ODFB as included by default, not something you have to configure for broader application

Q: If we have 10 users on E3 and 40 users on Business Essentials, do the messages created by the 40 Business Essentials users get evaluated by DLP? What about the server-side processing? If a non-E3 user sent a message that violates a DLP rule, would it be blocked, or would it be sent to the recipient?

A: DLP does require E3, so the non-E3 users would not get a DLP experience, aka the tool tips coming early next year. No, you need to have DLP licensing to enable server side and client side processing for sensitive content. So for eg, in exchange today, every time you use the “the message contains sensitive information” predicate, you need DLP license.

Q: We have a system that generates PDF reports and emails them via SMTP. We use DLP to block the messages from being forwarded but we would like to apply document level IRM as it enters the system via SMTP?

A: Look at adding a document library into your solution. You could then add additional capabilities if above needs a little more.

Q: Can you please elaborate on the phrase “with additional policy controls and actions like Information Rights Management, coming in the first quarter of 2015″ from the 10/28 blog post on DLP? What might this mean in terms of capabilities?

A: In our initial release for SPO policies, you will have actions such as block or request access when someone uploads a document. With RMS action, you will be able to automatically apply IRM action to the uploaded document if the document contains sensitive information.

Q: What will happen if a document is accessed through an API using custom coding? Will DLP apply?

A: If the content is stored in a location that is subject to a DLP policy, such as SharePoint – then yes the changes will be scanned and subject to the DLP requirements in the policy.

Q: Will Microsoft provide a way to automatically add ODFB sites (as they are provisioned) to DLP scope?

A: Yes, you can configure a DLP policy to apply to “all” OneDrive for Business sites, which will automatically include new sites as they are provisioned.

Q: <em?Will the fact that IRM is applied to a document be able to overwrite DLP actions? For instance if IRM is applied with ‘lower’ restrictions, van DLP apply more restrictieve restrictions? Consider this example: IRM can be configured by Site Admins, so a site admin makes a library for contracts. He configures very little restrictions. At company (DLP) level we have a very strict policy and want to override what the site admin on lower level set up.

A: We currently do not allow IRM policy override. This is an interesting feature request. will be available when our policy actions are available in early 2015.

Q: We found the mobility use case to be painful as iOS and Android devices cannot open IRM protected documents minus a few exceptions like PDFs with a purchased app. When is this targeted to change to where the Office Mobile apps will support IRM protected documents?

A: It works great today for email across OWA for devices, Outlook, Outlook for MAC, OWA etc and you can expect us to add the same functionality across Office documents. IRM works today for documents on ODFB so yes Azure RMS works for OneDrive for business.

Q: With an increasing number of non-technical small business users, what is the plan to give true user account management to Global Admins in O365? This weekend we had to terminate a long time employee who lives in a different state. I checked every source for clear guidelines and documentation surrounding this is nearly non-existent. There is no simple way to prevent loss of information other than resetting the user password. If “blocked” then we could not go into Exchange Online or ODFB to back up information. If we remove licenses, we lose all data. If we turn mailbox into shared, we lose auto archive folder/ability. We cannot backup to a PST due to auto archive as well. Four days after the fact, we learned that resetting the password means they can still have access to any sessions of mail, CRM, SharePoint that have not expired. How are we supposed to manage security under these conditions? Please advise when your 100% “cloud first/mobile first” O365 Online small business customers can expect to have the right tools to terminate an employee while preventing any data loss.

A: The scenario you describe is well covered in the enterprise, where we have additional value in the E1-E4 plans. And I’m guessing you know this, but want to be clear that all the compliance tools like RMS, DLP, eDiscovery … they are only offered to enterprise. It is very common to find smaller businesses using the enterprise plans when their needs require the more robust compliance capabilities. Consider upgrading your plan to enterprise. This article should get you started: I can tell you that you can recover documents. You would need to assign a secondary user who can then go into users’ ODFB. You can do this today here: SPO admin center > user profiles > Set up MySites > My Site Cleanup – and then add a secondary owner.

Here’s the text from in-product once you get to this admin setting, “My Site Cleanup”. When a user’s profile has been deleted, that user’s My Site will be flagged for deletion after fourteen days. To prevent data loss, access to the former user’s My Site can be granted to the user’s manager or, in the absence of a manager, a secondary My Site owner. This gives the manager or the secondary owner an opportunity to retrieve content from the My Site before it is deleted. Select whether or not ownership of the Site should be transferred to a manager or secondary owner before the site is deleted. Set a secondary owner to receive access in situations in which a user’s manager cannot be determined.

Q: Any plans to add DLP to Yammer? For instance if a user decides to share his credit card number on Yammer he will get a policy tip; Such as not allowing videos to be downloaded (but only to be viewed), to making sure that PII is not being shared inadvertently in healthcare or insurance companies. You can overcome these things with peer governance but it would be great to have some tech in place too.

A: Definitively something that we are thinking about. What kind of scenarios would you like to see if/when this would happen?

Q: When or will Data Loss Prevention (DLP) become available in the On-Premise version of SharePoint?

A: We’re not ready to discuss any portion of SharePoint Server vNext (on-premises) and what will be included. That said, there are a number of 3rd party solutions today that can be integrated with SharePoint already.

SharePoint Online eDiscovery Center For All Your Legal Needs

ediscovery Featured

Ever have requests to furnish old emails, messages, documents to your HR or legal teams? In this digital era, we experience an overflow of electronic information in forms of email, documents, IM conversations, etc. It can be chaotic when you are expected to look for content from several years in the past. Have you ever wondered what it would be like if you had a tool to help with ESI (electronic stored information) to collect, classify, and analyze? Even better, a tool that allows you to then preview and preserve for as long as your corporate policies allow?

The most-affected workgroups are Legal, IT, and the governance, risk, and compliance folks, who must manage all of the data legal and compliance groups are desperately trying to search. Now with Office 365, you can do just that and more. Office 365 equips you with an eDiscovery center to manage preservation, search, and export of content stored in Exchange and SharePoint, across SharePoint farms and Exchange servers.

eDiscovery2

Your SharePoint Online tenant comes with a pre-created eDiscovery center. What it needs from you is, configuring discovery sets and setting up your search queries in order to export the results. With SharePoint Online you can run an eDiscovery case on SharePoint, Exchange, Lync, and on premises File Shares at the same time, from one management console. This lets you search, preserve, and export all relevant content from all these repositories. For every discovery case, you would create a new case site where it is possible to conduct searches, place content on hold, and export content. There are new capabilities in eDiscovery you need to be aware of:

  • eDiscovery Sets: Combinations of sources, filters, and whether to preserve content. eDiscovery Sets are used to identify and preserve content.
  • In-Place Hold: Now you can preserve sites and mailboxes using search filters. Preservation works behind the scenes… people can work on their documents and delete email and not even know it is turned on, but for eDiscovery, you have the data you need in an immutable store.

eDiscovery3

 

  • Query: Search experience which is eDiscovery focused. This reduces the output data and help you find the content you are looking for.
  • Export: Download all of the data  directly to a local machine with an offline copy of native documents, email PSTs, archived MHT web pages, and CSV files for SharePoint lists.

eDiscovery4

eDiscovery5

After searching for relevant content in a eDiscovery set, you may want to put content on hold. This enables the original content to always there when your legal department asks for it. The eDiscovery center allows you to put SharePoint sites and Exchange mailboxes on hold, without disrupting the business.  Putting a SharePoint site on hold creates a hidden document library. This enables the user to still modify any content item subject to the legal hold while keeping the original copy of the item in that hidden library. Exchange mailboxes apply the same principle by creating a hidden folder where items are actually moved to when a user deletes an item.

This post guided you through the benefits and process to setup eDiscovery and empower your legal department to query and export content to help in any litigation or compliance needs. In the next few posts, I’ll dive into some other advanced security features in Office 365.

Yammer Governance: Working Like a (Safer) Network – Webinar Recap

Each and every time my colleague, Rich Wood, speaks on a webinar or presents at an event, I know it’s going to be good. Whether his audience is more business or technically oriented, or a healthy mix, he has a knack for presenting content in an engaging manner and a way that’s easy to digest (even for this marketer). And just as expected, during last week’s webinar, “Planning for Governance in Yammer While Working Like a Network,” Rich did not disappoint.

Enterprise social networks are, by default, a more informal, natural means of communication and collaboration, whether it be with internal employees, customers and/or partners. Many companies with an enterprise social network in place are benefiting from improved knowledge transfer, empowering employees and breaking down organizational barriers. But, because of concerns around privacy and governance, the majority of companies have yet to take advantage of an ESN such as Yammer.

During the session, Rich, who heads up our Modern Applications practice at Perficient, began with a discussion around the philosophy behind Yammer. He emphasized that Yammer is not SharePoint. We are all so used to thinking of “governance” in a SharePoint context, it can be difficult to wrap your mind around how to govern a Yammer network properly and encourage user engagement. While SharePoint focuses on document collaboration, with Yammer, it’s all about social collaboration. With that different purpose comes a different philosophy.  In SharePoint, the greater user population has the least rights in common areas, and with Yammer, it’s the reverse. Those same users have the most rights in common areas. Read the rest of this post »