Posts Tagged ‘UX for Accessible Design’

Create More Accessible Web Design for Disability Using These 3 Scenarios

Web accessibility is an important part of inclusion for people with disabilities, especially now due to the COVID-19 pandemic. People are doing more and more online, from ordering groceries, to medications, and even car shopping. In today’s world, it seems that anything can be ordered online, and for most people, it can. But for individuals […]

The Beauty of Simplicity: The Key to Accessible Web Design

In today’s hectic world, humans are increasingly drawn to simplicity. Stemming from a rising need for everyday efficiency and speed, we are in constant search for the next new technology that will make our lives easier. While this inclination toward simplicity is likely intuitive for most aspects of modern life, we often see the opposite […]

A Process Integration Timeline of Accessibility Testing

All too often, accessibility does not cross the mind of designers or developers until it is too late in the process. Approaching accessibility as a final checkbox in the entire process of a webpage and website development will result in exurbanite defects and adversely affect the final product. Developers and designers must take on the […]

It’s a Program, Not a Project: Designing Websites for Accessibility

Many companies view accessibility remediation as a one-off project or a parallel effort to their current development life cycle. In fact, it is the opposite. Accessibility should be integrated into your overall design process from the very beginning. It’s important to focus on the benefits and advantages of “shifting left” and incorporating accessibility into the […]

Understanding Disability Types for Effective UI Design: 3 Key Factors for Empathetic Problem-Solving

The Assumptions We Make About Disability What comes to mind when you’re thinking about what it means for a person to be disabled? Are they deaf? Is their mobility compromised in some way? What about their vision? It’s important to remember that senses and abilities like these aren’t only reserved for those with permanent disabilities. […]