Healthcare Industry Trends Blog http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare A Perficient Blog Thu, 23 Oct 2014 18:00:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 Copyright © Healthcare IT Solutions 2011 gserafini@gmail.com (Healthcare Industry Trends Blog) gserafini@gmail.com (Healthcare Industry Trends Blog) 1440 http://www.perficient.com/About/~/media/Images/About/perficient_logo_small.jpg Healthcare Industry Trends Blog http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare 144 144 A Perficient Blog Healthcare Industry Trends Blog Healthcare Industry Trends Blog gserafini@gmail.com no no Webinar: Healthcare Enterprise Data Model: Buy vs. Build Debate http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/23/webinar-healthcare-enterprise-data-model-buy-vs-build-debate/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/23/webinar-healthcare-enterprise-data-model-buy-vs-build-debate/#comments Thu, 23 Oct 2014 18:00:27 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=7099 Transformation is sweeping across healthcare in the United States at a rapid rate. Healthcare organizations, regardless of size, need to embrace new technologies in order to keep up with the quickly changing landscape and comply with evolving regulatory requirements.Healthcare Enterprise Data Model: Buy vs Build Debate

The solutions to these challenges have one thing in common, the need for accurate information. In some cases, the information required can be sourced from a single system, but in many situations, the need requires information from a wide range of systems that could include Electronic Medical Records (EMR), Claims, Financial and Human Resources.

The solution for many organizations starts with the creation of an enterprise wide data warehouse (EDW) that serves as their “single version of truth”. At the foundation of the data warehouse is the need for a data model that accurately organizes the data in meaningful ways. Many organizations will build their own data model while others will look to leverage an industry proven data model from an experienced vendor. This choice to buy vs. build, can be one that causes great debate within organizations both large and small.

At a high level, the pros to building your own enterprise data model will come down to flexibility and control. If you choose to build your own customized model, you will get to make each and every design decision based on how your organization operates, this can be very tempting.

The main advantage to buying a data model is the time to implementation. Many of the tough decisions are made for you, based on years of experience across a wide range of customers; purchased models are often much faster to implement.

As the debate continues you will need to weigh factors like experience, time to value, risk, integration accelerators and impact on your staff. Each of these topics needs to be considered as your organization decides whether to buy or build your enterprise data model.

Interested in more information on how to weigh the pros and cons of this critical enterprise decision? Join Perficient on November 18th for a complimentary webinar. We will examine critical factors that need to be evaluated when deciding whether to build or buy an enterprise data model. We will explore real-life client stories and discuss how they benefited from their decisions.

Upcoming Webinar: Healthcare Enterprise Data Model: The Buy vs Build Debate
Tuesday, November 18, 2014 @ 2:00 PM CT

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/23/webinar-healthcare-enterprise-data-model-buy-vs-build-debate/feed/ 0
In Healthcare, Connectivity Is Not Collaborating http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/16/in-healthcare-connectivity-is-not-collaborating/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/16/in-healthcare-connectivity-is-not-collaborating/#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 19:00:22 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=7081 Interoperability between different electronic health record (EHR) systems is one of the most important requirements that hospitals and physicians must meet as they prepare their systems for attestation in Meaningful Use Stage 2.

However, let’s examine the real goals of interoperability within healthcare: In Healthcare Connectivity is not Collaborating

1) To make sure “information follows the patient regardless of geographic, organizational, or vendor boundaries”

2) To have at least one or more instances in which providers exchange an electronic summary of care with all the clinical data elements between different EHRs. Establishing this connectivity does not insure the real goal of collaborating across the continuum of care for the patient’s benefit.

The debate still rages on the role of the patient in this interoperability process as well. We have all, as patients, had our medical files spread across a family doctor, multiple hospitals, specialists, health plans and today, even multiple pharmacies. The prospect of creating a complete picture is staggering, let alone having all of those healthcare providers really collaborate on our behalf. Is it the patient’s responsibility in this ever-changing healthcare electronic revolution to compile this electronic mess into a coordinated whole or will the industry magically create it as a result of Meaningful Use Stage 2?

It is worth arguing that interoperability in Meaningful Use Stage 2 only creates a baseline of connectivity between two or more systems to exchange information and puts in place the ability of those systems to use the information that has been exchanged. It does not create collaboration on behalf of patients within the healthcare provider community, especially between competing players like local hospital systems or healthcare providers versus payers. Having the ability to connect only trades fax machines for electronic transactions, if tools aren’t employed for physicians for example to collaborate over a single patient.

In advocating for collaboration, let’s examine the reality of an exchange of a set of electronic transactions about a patient versus where the process would need to be for genuine care coordination. Today, a fax from the hospital to the family physician is the notification that the patient was hospitalized and needs follow-up in coming weeks. Based on the type of hospitalization, a call between the attending physician and family physician may be warranted, and a potential referral to a subsequent specialist may be in order. Simply communicating electronic documents doesn’t address the interaction between key people in the decision-making process and the assumption that the inclusion of unstructured physician notes will suffice may be optimistic.

This means that health information exchange is different than health information interoperability. Exchange is necessary for interoperability, but it is not sufficient by itself to achieve health information interoperability, especially to streamline real collaboration on behalf of patients. It is time to examine an expanded view of both interoperability and health information exchange to promote ease of collaboration between the parties involved, including secure physician to physician communications – electronic or instant message, for example, and secure physician to patient communications. As an individual patient having to deal with multiple patient portals today for communicating with my healthcare providers, there is a real concern to address this issue sooner rather than clean up confusion later.

Can we define collaboration in a way that traverses healthcare’s landscape of emerging connectivity?

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/16/in-healthcare-connectivity-is-not-collaborating/feed/ 0
The Problem with Health IT is in the Definition http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/13/the-problem-with-health-it-is-in-the-definition/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/13/the-problem-with-health-it-is-in-the-definition/#comments Mon, 13 Oct 2014 18:21:45 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=7051 There has been a lot of debate around the challenges within the healthcare industry. Much of the discussion stems from the fee-for-service model and the focus on services and reimbursement rather than the patient. Health information technology has its own set of challenges when it comes to addressing healthcare issues. The Problem with Health IT is in the Definition

If we truly want to put the patient at the center of their own healthcare experience than we need to take a step back and look at the relationship of the patient and the entire healthcare ecosystem. Healthcare should focus less on the products and services and more on the patient and provider relationship. Furthermore, health IT should support these relationships, however, by its own definition it doesn’t.

By definition,  Health information technology (IT) encompasses a wide range of products and services—including software, hardware and infrastructure—designed to collect, store and exchange patient data throughout the clinical practice of medicine.

The definition does not mention the patient and provider relationship and the emphasis is on products and services, software and hardware and does not reflect on the benefits of patient data exchange.

A better health IT definition: An automated approach that facilitates the relationship between the patient and the healthcare system through the accurate and secure electronic exchange of data, ensuring the right data is available at the right time for everyone that is engaged in the patient’s care.

This definition includes 3 critical components:

  • The importance of the patient relationship with the healthcare system
  • The importance of accurate and secure electronic data exchange
  • The benefits of data exchange in regards to patient care

A new definition will not solve the challenges of the healthcare industry, but it is a good place to start. It may be enough of a push to ensure technology developers are developing meaningful applications that improve patient outcomes, which should be the ultimate goal of health IT.

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/13/the-problem-with-health-it-is-in-the-definition/feed/ 0
Upcoming Webinar: Combine Data to Enable Translational Medicine http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/09/upcoming-webinar-combine-data-to-enable-translational-medicine/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/09/upcoming-webinar-combine-data-to-enable-translational-medicine/#comments Thu, 09 Oct 2014 18:40:52 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=7074 The success of translational medicine is in the data and the ability to combine multiple sources of data to enable better patient care and outcomes. Unfortunately most academic research organizations (ARO) and hospitals have multiple systems that house data creating an inability to mine through the data to identify clinical insights, disease patterns or treatment options. Combining Patient Records, Genomic Data and Environmental Data to Enable Translational Medicine

Patient records, genomic data and environmental data need to be in sync to speed the process of bringing safer therapies to market and provide “bench to bedside” medicine. Combining multiple sources of data can enable complex and meaningful querying, reporting and analysis for the purposes of improving patient safety and care, boosting operational efficiency, and supporting personalized medicine initiatives. Integrated data will  enable implementation and delivery of translational medicine anytime and anywhere.

Please join Perficient’s Mike Grossman, a director of clinical data warehousing and analytics, and Martin Sizemore, a healthcare strategist, for a complimentary one-hour webinar in which they will discuss:
  • How AROs and hospitals can benefit from a systematic approach to combining data from diverse systems and utilizing a suite of data extraction, reporting, and analytical tools, in order to support a wide variety of needs and requests
  • Examples of proposed solutions to real-life challenges AROs and hospitals often encounter

To register for the webinar click here
Combining Patient Records, Genomic Data and Environmental Data to Enable Translational Medicine
Wednesday, October 15, 2014  | 1:00 PM CT

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/09/upcoming-webinar-combine-data-to-enable-translational-medicine/feed/ 0
No Easy Outs in Healthcare BI, but a New Approach http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/08/no-easy-outs-in-healthcare-bi-but-a-new-approach/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/08/no-easy-outs-in-healthcare-bi-but-a-new-approach/#comments Wed, 08 Oct 2014 16:52:24 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=7057 When you played baseball as a youngster, and stepped into the batter’s box, the last thing you wanted to be was an “easy out”. Ironically, today many healthcare organizations are looking for the “easy out” to rapidly develop the business intelligence reporting needed to address regulatory reporting demands, population health No easy outs with healthcare BI, but a new approachmanagement and chronic condition management, to name just a few.

The pressure to quickly stand-up an enterprise data warehouse, put data governance in place, start loading and cleaning data is intense just to get to the point of creating dashboards and offering mobile BI. Overloaded Healthcare IT teams are dealing with demands to compress traditional time-frames of 18-24 months to get the BI foundation in place down to as little as 4-5 months, start to finish.

This situation begs the old saying of “do you want it fast or do you want it right?” You can bet the answer today is both. Generally, healthcare organizations develop a BI strategy that examines the current state BI architecture, envision a future state BI architecture, document the gaps and create a time phased roadmap to build out the infrastructure, software and development required to meet the business needs. Just describing the process tells us that it will be complex and time consuming, right?

It is time to examine the traditional waterfall development approach to building enterprise data warehouses necessary for addressing the current demands for business intelligence in healthcare. While we could dialog on the use of Agile versus waterfall for development, I want to propose a more radical approach: a business intelligence assembly line process. We need to reorganize our thinking towards automating the steps to deliver raw materials quickly, i.e. identifying a data source, gauging its quality and delivering it for assembly, before adding it to the BI visualization process. The data normalization and data quality can be addressed with another manufacturing idea: continuous improvement over time. Instead of traditional thinking of having to move all data into a common data model, this approach allows for data sources (raw materials) to be substituted, if needed, in the assembly line process for business intelligence reporting over time.

The people, process and technologies need to be aligned to the assembly line process for delivering high-quality products (dashboards and reports) faster and faster from re-usable components in the process. Engineering a new product would start with a design goal and identify how it would be built as opposed to only delivering what the underlying data warehouse can deliver. This assembly line approach provides the flexibility to introduce new concepts like big data or streaming real-time data as manufacturing techniques to speed up assembly line delivery without the big bottleneck of forcing everything through a common data model or wait for assimilation into the enterprise data warehouse.

Trusted data sources, like trusted raw material vendors, will be the secret to rapid BI manufacturing success. Do you like the idea of a business intelligence assembly line versus standing up a whole factory? Let’s poke holes in the idea to see if it is a better alternative!

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/10/08/no-easy-outs-in-healthcare-bi-but-a-new-approach/feed/ 0
Budgets: Daily, Weekly, Monthly or Annually? http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/30/budgets-daily-weekly-monthly-or-annually/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/30/budgets-daily-weekly-monthly-or-annually/#comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 15:00:45 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=7040 I think most healthcare entities are now moving to a more frequent budget cycle and if academic, they probably have to do a semi-annual legislative budget. They probably also at a minimum re-forecast based on updated actuals once a quarter.

Is their value though to gathering actuals daily or weekly and adjusting tactical plans based on current month trends? In today’s rapidly Budgets: Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Annuallyevolving healthcare environment, provider organizations must be able to identify financial performance gaps continuously and quickly change course when needed.   As we discussed in my blog: The Role of Finance Within the Hospital has been Elevated, this requires a partnership with operations to ensure that the correct metrics are correlated within the budget process. Agility is also influenced by the mechanism the hospital uses for budgeting and whether they use a rolling forecast to replace or supplement the annual budget process.

What is a rolling forecast? The rolling forecast is usually a quarterly budget with a two to three year horizon that keeps a close eye on the organization trajectory. Typically the forecast budget is not prepared at the department level but may instead focus on divisions or even at a hospital level. Global budget drivers and assumptions will typically be the same as the annual budget but those unique to a department or division may not be line items. The forecast is built using historical trends, current conditions and future assumptions for budget drivers. Some forecasts may be primarily driven by revenue drivers with expenses flowing from ratios defined to the model.

The forecast feedback process fosters the partnership between finance and operations to allow the organization to course correct sooner and reinforce the cause and effect relationships that impact reality.   Some organizations use the rolling forecast process in conjunction with the annual budget and others have moved to using the forecast only.

Benefits of replacing the annual process with a rolling forecast may include:

  • Spending fewer resources on budget preparation and variance analysis.
  • Reinforces a culture of continuous performance management.
  • Allows a longer ramp-up time for course correction.
  • Supports the organization’s economic model (3-5 year macro level plan) used for capital allocation decisions, margin targets, M&A modeling and other purposes.

The rolling forecast should be tailored to meet your organization’s needs and based on my experience; the forecast should be a continuous learning process and more flexible to make necessary changes when needed from both a process and a technology perspective.

Perficient is a large healthcare systems integrator with deep healthcare domain expertise and we are a platinum Oracle partner having implemented over 450 projects leveraging the Oracle Enterprise Performance Management platform.   Stop by our booth at #OOW14 from September 29th – October 1st at the Healthcare Solutions Pavilion in Industry Central (Marriott Hotel Atrium Lobby booth HMH-003) and at the Perficient Main Booth #2221: Moscone South Exhibition Hall Level 1.

Watch our blog for more details about what we are learning at OOW14!

Follow me on twitter @teriemc

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/30/budgets-daily-weekly-monthly-or-annually/feed/ 0
Hospital Price Transparency – Step 1: Understand True Cost http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/29/hospital-price-transparency-step-1-understand-true-cost/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/29/hospital-price-transparency-step-1-understand-true-cost/#comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 19:30:58 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=7034 Is there a correlation between price transparency and cost? I read an article in the HFMA Strategic Financial Planning Newsletter recently about this and I can relate my personal experiences to it wholeheartedly. My observations are that hospitals segregate these two activities but I believe they are explicitly linked. I know there are many factors that influence Hospital Price Transparancyprice setting, not the least of which is the federal government (Medicare/Medicaid), but I suspect the reason that hospitals don’t more closely link pricing to margins is that they lack visibility into their own data.

When I first started working in healthcare in the late 90’s, my only prior exposure to revenue cycle automation came from the airline industry where pricing is tightly linked to both demand and yield.   I was part of the team that helped Continental Airlines transition into the era of de-regulation. It didn’t take industry leaders very long to identify the metrics that truly informed pricing once the government was taken out of the equation. This taught me very valuable lessons about analytics and instilled in me a drive to use data to improve operations.

To understand and achieve sufficient transparency and maintain a proactive approach to maintaining margins, hospitals must be capable of correlating costs for supplies and drugs, etc. with the cost of providers and overhead costs. Then they must compare this with the payments from payers, individuals and other purchasers. While we certainly can’t take the federal government out of the equation for hospitals, recent expectations have been set for quality performance that may help the affected organizations begin to take a more margin focused view of pricing. Bringing together the necessary data is not simple and definitely should be approached iteratively using a configurable set of analytic tools that can provide the right data to the right individuals in the organization who manage operations and continue or create new services.

The Perficient High-Performance Costing Expressway provides a complete solution that enables hospitals to rapidly deploy a micro-level costing solution. It provides integrated software and hardware with a prescribed set of data integrations and services to quickly deploy a costing application. The Perficient High-Performance Costing Expressway leverages Oracle’s Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management (HPCM) and Enterprise Health Analytics (EHA) solutions and is also an integrated foundation for applications of advanced costing.

View our most recent costing webinar Align Patient Outcomes with Financial Data: a Formula for Correlating Cost and Quality for an overview of the High-Performance Costing Expressway and download our white paper.

Also, please visit the Perficient team at Oracle OpenWorld 2014 (#OOW14) from September 29th – October 1st at the Healthcare Solutions Pavilion in Industry Central (Marriott Hotel Atrium Lobby booth HMH-003) and at the Perficient Main Booth #2221: Moscone South Exhibition Hall Level 1. Watch our blog for more details about what we are learning at OOW14!

Follow me on twitter @teriemc

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/29/hospital-price-transparency-step-1-understand-true-cost/feed/ 0
Sure, it’s huge, but this is my favorite new iPhone feature http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/24/sure-its-huge-but-this-is-my-favorite-new-iphone-feature/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/24/sure-its-huge-but-this-is-my-favorite-new-iphone-feature/#comments Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:38:37 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=7019 I’m having a good laugh at all of the memes floating through social on the “hugeness” that is the new iPhone 6.  Apple even wisely predicted the size sentiment (℅ super user research) and landed a spot featuring Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake that provides a few laughs.

So, while size-by-size comparisons are even a thing in my household (husband has the new phone while I’m skipping a version), I’ve found that my favorite features of the new release are actually a part of iOS8, and, therefore, I don’t need to get the new phone, and the extra inch of screen size that provides, to have them.

So what new iPhone feature has me all giddy and excited?  Safety.  FOSgNia

Let me explain.  I’m a big fan of the Quantified Self, and, as a runner and biking enthusiast, I like apps that help me track my progress.  I especially like when those apps are extensible and connect to provide an entire Quantified Self experience.  I’m not here to talk about HealthKit, though.   I’m here to talk about a lack of functionality I have found in these apps when it comes to safety.  I’m a woman running or cycling alone, and sometimes, if my work day creeps into the evening, the sun goes down before I get started.  I’ve combed the app store trying to find an answer, and there really aren’t good answers out there.  What I need is:

  • A way to alert loved ones passively if I run into trouble while I’m running or riding my bike.  It’s not really reasonable to expect that I can reach for my phone and make a call if I’m, for whatever reason, not able to complete those steps in the process.
  • A way to inform an EMT that may arrive on a scene when I am unable to communicate.

The iOS answers to these problems:

  • Share my Location: When I’m ready for a run, iOS lets me set up a window for when and who I want my whereabouts shared with.  I can set up the time parameters I have for my run, say 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., and share my location with my husband and best friend until I alert them that I am home.  If they don’t hear from me when they are supposed to, then they not only know something is up, but they know where I am as well. What I’d love for iOS to add is a way to send an alert if I fall during a run or ride.  I know, because of the ActivBeacon app, that this is possible.  The downside of ActivBeacon is that, for whatever reason, the app malfunctions and turns my volume up to full blast when I have both music and the app running at the same time.  Eye of the Tiger loses its motivational effectiveness at that volume.  Trust me, I know.
  • Medical ID:  The Medical ID, part of the Health App can be used by medical responders to know of any allergies or medical conditions I have and who to contact without unlocking my phone.   To do so, open the Health App and click on “Create Medical ID” that you see in red.  In the Medical ID you can add our name, birthday, height, weight, medical conditions, medical notes, allergies, medications, blood type, and organ donor status.  You can also add your emergency contact.   You will also want to make sure that you have the “Show When Locked” feature on.

So, there you have it.  If you know of any alternative options for exercise safety, then I’d love to hear about them!

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/24/sure-its-huge-but-this-is-my-favorite-new-iphone-feature/feed/ 0
The Key to Driving Down Healthcare Costs http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/23/the-key-to-driving-down-healthcare-costs-oow2014/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/23/the-key-to-driving-down-healthcare-costs-oow2014/#comments Tue, 23 Sep 2014 07:00:44 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=6975 Healthcare costs are rising at a faster pace than the economy is growing. Hospitals are often the focus of this concern, because they constitute the largest single component of healthcare spending. When looking at hospital costs, it is important to keep in mind that there are both direct and indirect expenses that contribute HighPerformanceCostingExpressway_largeto the total cost of care.

How do we understand total cost of care? Our team of experts leverages a proprietary technology for our clients called the Perficient High-Performance Costing Expressway, which enables transparency of fully burdened margin by service, patient and procedure. For decades, spreadsheets and costing software have been the best alternatives in determining cost of care. It is now more important than ever to transform these methods and leverage administrative, clinical and financial data in order to gain control of healthcare costs. Creating transparent costing models to indicate profitability across multiple dimensions of data is the key to driving healthcare costs down.

Embracing data-driven decision making in a provider setting requires agile thinking to pinpoint and respond to the short- and long-term needs of the organization. This shift requires finance departments to transcend from the typical focus on aggregating data to a value-added analytical view of hospital data. This new approach will provide greater visibility into changes in variables and assumptions and will require organizations to fully understand and ensure transparency exists for key performance indicators.

In evaluating supplies, labor, productivity or clinical effectiveness, the quality/cost/value equation requires an organization to truly understand its data. This includes not only considering the right product at the right place but also applying a broader perspective on clinical evidence for resources used and approaches employed. Data by itself doesn’t make a company successful; organizations must act on information and filter what is useful, appropriate, and above all else actionable. Those few organizations that are able to transform data into decisions and harness the power of insightful and timely analytics are ahead of their competition.

Perficient will be on hand to demonstrate the High-Performance Costing Expressway on display at OpenWorld 2014. Stop by and visit with our Healthcare experts at the Healthcare Solutions in Industry Central (Marriott Hotel 2nd floor).
Not attending #OOW14? Learn more about our costing solution here.

Follow me on twitter @teriemc

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/23/the-key-to-driving-down-healthcare-costs-oow2014/feed/ 0
Knowledge Drives Precision http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/22/knowledge-drives-precision/ http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/22/knowledge-drives-precision/#comments Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:15:09 +0000 http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/?p=6969 In recent years, dramatic advances in molecular biology, genomics, and related technologies have resulted in greater understanding of cancer at the molecular level. It is now possible not only to identify the genetic and molecular variations in each patient’s cancer cells, but to apply the results from the tumor profile, inKnowledge Drives Precision some circumstances, to begin to inform treatment strategies that target the molecular underpinnings of the specific disease in each patient.

“Precision medicine,” also known as “personalized medicine,” is the term used for this transformative new model of health care that involves the selection of diagnostic tests that have the potential to identify changes in each individual patient’s cancer cells. The use of that knowledge may help to prevent and treat cancer through the development of treatment strategies to target these specific molecular alterations. Ultimately, the goal of precision oncology is to improve patient outcomes. 1

I attended a conference session recently on this topic where an esteemed speaker panel took the audience though their vision of a time in our future when we could have a simple blood test on the way to our doctor’s office and arrive at the appointment to find our doctor fully prepared with a diagnosis and the ideal medication would already be identified based on our genetic makeup and perfectly formulated to avoid side effects for which you we are susceptible. Imagine this on a larger scale to speed up drug development, to create more precise therapies, faster and less expensively and apply this approach to improve the lives of people worldwide, at lower cost.

Perficient is helping clients such as the University of Colorado to establish a fully integrated informatics “highway” for precision medicine using the Oracle Health Sciences Translational Research Center platform to address formidable challenges such as:

  • Data Integration – the most foundational challenge is the need for an integrated data infrastructure spanning fully the genotype and phenotype (i.e., molecular and clinical attributes) of research subjects and patients
  • Individual Data Records – relevant data from the basic science, translational, clinical research, and health care domains need to be fully integrated at the individual data record, in order to produce “personalized medicine” models.2

Join us at #OOW14 to hear Michael Ames, MBI, Associate Director, Health Data Compass, Center for Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine, University of Colorado and my colleague Lesli Adams, MPA @LesliAdams during the session “Creating a Digital Healthcare Safety Net with EHA and OBI for Care Transitions” located at the Marriott Marquis – Salon 10/11; Wednesday, October 1, 11:30am – 12:15pm.

We are an Oracle Platinum partner and we’ve gained valuable expertise from nearly 2,000 Oracle projects with our clients the past 15 years and we have amassed vast amounts of best practices and ideas to share. Stop by and visit with our Healthcare experts at the Healthcare Solutions in Industry Central (Marriott Hotel Atrium Lobby) at the Perficient kiosk (HMH-003) for a demo of the Translational Research Center.

Not attending #OOW14? Join our webinar Combining Patient Records, Genomic Data and Environmental Data to Enable Translational Medicine Wednesday, October 15, 2014 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CT.

Sources:

1 http://www.n-of-one.com/about/what-is-precision-medicine.php

2 Michael Ames, MBI, Associate Director, Health Data Compass, Center for Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine, University of Colorado

 

Follow me on twitter @teriemc

]]>
http://blogs.perficient.com/healthcare/blog/2014/09/22/knowledge-drives-precision/feed/ 0