Life at Perficient

A Study in Personality Tests: The Enneagram Quiz

At the start of 2020, Perficient kicked off its Growth for Everyone campaign with a self-discovery initiative. The first post of the series, A Study in Personality Tests: What Can They Do for You?, explored the psychological and professional benefits of personality tests, while highlighting some of the most influential assessments. To further the discussion, some of our employees took the popular Enneagram quiz.

The Enneagram Assessment, which skyrocketed in popularity during 2019, outlines nine personality types that each of us fits into. The test elucidates how our “type” impacts everything from confidence to conflict resolution, and even how the types are interconnected. Each type is given an epithet to reflect its dominating trait: Reformer, Helper, Achiever, Individualist, Investigator, Loyalist, Enthusiast, Challenger, and Peacemaker. Keep reading to see how Perficient employees stack up!

Take the Enneagram test here!

Learn more about your personality type on the official Enneagram Institute website, where you can even sign up for your EnneaThought® for the Day email. Let us know what your result was in the comments below. Did you agree?

An Overview of Enneagram Types

Type 1: The Reformer (or Perfectionist)

A word for the One: INTEGRITY

With a heart of gold and unwavering integrity, Ones are dubbed “Reformers” for their dedication to doing the right thing. Detail-oriented and a rule-follower, a One strives to exceed expectations. In the workplace, an honest One gives carefully composed feedback. Ones brainstorm solutions to problems in lieu of ruminating over challenges. Their integrity inspires their teammates to step up to the plate. One’s core qualities include honesty, dependability, responsibility, integrity, and righteousness. 

Kelly Scott, Perficient’s Payroll Coordinator, is a prime example of a Reformer. Kelly’s role at Perficient requires that she be detail-oriented and diligent in her responsibilities. She shared, “I think being a One makes me a great worker, as I am always checking things off my list, staying productive, and looking for ways to improve on current systems and processes.” 

Type 2: The Helper

A word for the Two: GIVE

Nurturing, altruistic, and warm-hearted is the Two. Otherwise known as “The Helper,” Twos seek to be of service to others. Their willingness to step up and be of assistance makes them superlative leaders and role-models. Twos value relationships and loyalty, and as a result, they are devoted friends, partners, and colleagues. Their core qualities include generosity, communication/intrapersonal skills, compassion, empathy, and selflessness. 

Aimee Hagnauer (Corporate Marketing) fits well into the Helper personality type: “I got Two as a 98% match. While I’m not surprised by reading the description, past tests have given me higher Fours, Sixes, and Sevens.” Aimee added that she has grown considerably since beginning her career at Perficient, and that “It only makes sense that as we change and grow, our Enneagram scores fluctuate with us.”

Type 3: The Achiever

A word for the Three: HUSTLE

Threes are movers, shakers, leaders, and game-changers. Threes make a splash in every social situation, as they effortlessly captivate an audience. The overlap of TedTalk speakers and Threes transforms a Venn Diagram into a single circle. Drive, charm, and focus define the Three. A Three bleeds coffee, runs a company, and balances several projects (all while training for a half-marathon and pinning their goals to a vision board). The remarkable Three often goes on to achieve great success!

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Interestingly, Type 3 was a popular result among Perficient employees. Several colleagues shared that if Three wasn’t their primary type, it was the second-highest. Threes’ core qualities include ambition, confidence, focus, and energy. Perficient Threes Marisa Lather (Corporate Marketing) and Ryan Manse (St. Louis Consulting) stay busy at the office by leading committees and promoting the company’s many events. 

Type 4: Individualist

A word for the Four: CREATE

Call to mind a favorite poet, lyricist, or artist – there’s a good chance your muse is a Four. Fours’ greatest aim is to authentically express themselves. Their core qualities include creativity, authenticity, expression, and passion. Fours are sometimes withdrawn but flourish when in their creative element. They are the romantics and bohemians, inspiring others with their knack for all things imaginative. Type Four, Chris Oropeza (Corporate HR) shared that his results have encouraged him to grow personally and professionally. 

Type 5: Investigator

A word for the Five: LEARN

Fives are perceptive, innovative, and contemplative. They value knowledge above all else. Fives’ main goal is to feel competent and well-informed. These investigators scroll through Reddit, read about the latest trends in tech, practice their debate skills, and venerate the almighty “Facts.” Fives are logical individuals who simply ask that their space and alone time be respected, thank you very much. They thrive in a challenging and fast-paced work environment that requires swift and efficient learning. Famous Fives include Albert Einstein, Agatha Christie, Stephen Hawking, and other intellectuals. 

Type 6: Loyalist

A word for the Six: STABILITY

Sixes are security-oriented, cautious, loyal, self-aware, and at times, over-thinking. Sixes work hard and seek stability and loyalty from others. Trust is of utmost importance to the Loyalist Six, and they can be hesitant in their decision-making. Kaleigh Schniepp (Corporate Talent Acquisition) shared that as a Six, she researches her decisions meticulously. She claims that she is most confident in her decisions when she spends time analyzing every angle. Anyone lucky enough to work with a Six benefits from their loyalty and forethought. Sixes present new perspectives to their teammates, as they can easily see many sides to a situation. They are cautious, but it is this caution that keeps them level-headed.

Type 7: Enthusiast (or Adventurer)

A word for the Seven: ENJOYMENT

A Seven, more so than the other types, has an insatiable hunger for life. Known for their curiosity, extroversion, and optimism, Sevens seek variety and enjoyment. A Seven is restless in pursuit of the newest adventures. As Perficient’s token Seven, I can vouch that my craze for life’s delights is unending. Sevens like myself prefer to stay busy, distracting themselves from negative emotions at all costs. While Sevens and Threes have much in common, a Three’s strongest desire is to achieve, while a Seven believes the journey to success should be enjoyable.

Sevens bring positivity and curiosity to the workplace, and their spark often ignites enthusiasm in others. They are famous for their gung-ho demeanor. Famous Sevens include Jack Black, Robin Williams, and Eddie Murphy, among several other entertainers. 

Type 8: The Challenger

A word for the Eight: CONTROL

Eights are independent and self-controlled. Additionally, Eights prefer to figure a problem out for themselves before taking advice. You might recognize a stubborn Eight in The Office’s Dwight Schrute, or in the husband who confidently ignores IKEA instructions. Eights make fantastic leaders, as they thrive when in control. The steadfast Eight defends causes they deem worthy but struggles when they are at the whim of others. Eights are logical and practical, and they excel as politicians, lawyers, and business owners. Our very own Cassie Mitchell (Corporate Talent Acquisition) confirmed that she is an Eight to the core.

Type 9: Peacemaker

A word for the Nine: HARMONY

As its title would indicate, Nines are the ultimate peacekeepers. They are agreeable, receptive, harmonious, conflict-avoidant, calm, and adaptable. Many counselors, diplomats, and human resource managers share this type. Marie Kondo, the Japanese organizing consultant, is a notable Type 9 (and truly, could any other type convince you to tidy up with a smile on your face?). Along with Type 3, Nine was one of the most popular results among Perficient employees. Perficient Nine’s include Jaida Blair (Corporate Talent Acquisition), Dan Dunsworth (Corporate IT), and Jeremy Limones (Corporate Marketing).

Continue the Conversation

Successful businesses know that employing talent with a variety of dispositions results in a well-rounded organization. A company is most victorious when its employees pull together. At Perficient, we are fortunate to have a team with a colorful range of skillsets, backgrounds, and demeanors. Taking personality tests, like the Enneagram, encourages professionals to compromise through their differences, bond in their similarities, and offer up what makes them exceptional.

Did you take the Enneagram assessment? If you haven’t yet, take the quiz to learn about yourself and your colleagues! Share your Enneagram results at your next department meeting, using the following questions to guide the conversation:

  • Did you agree with your results? Why or why not?
  • What strengths does your type bring to the table?
  • Where do you see room for improvement?
  • Do you find yourself agreeing or disagreeing with individuals of specific types?
  • How does knowing your type affect your plan for career development?

 

About the Author

Laura is a Talent Acquisition Coordinator at Perficient. Her professional interests are in writing, design, marketing, and public relations. In her free time, Laura is an avid rock climber and guitarist.

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Thoughts on “A Study in Personality Tests: The Enneagram Quiz”

  1. Great read! Very interesting and informative. I have taken tests like this before and my results are pretty consistent. I was a 9. My top three were 9, 2, and 1. I believe these tests are very helpful for self awareness and also beneficial in knowing how to communicate effectively with other styles. It proves that everyone brings something to the table personally and in the work place. This would be a great team building exercise.

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