Were Kim Kardashian's Instagram Posts Worth It?
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Were Kim Kardashian’s Instagram Posts Worth It?

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Since the infamous Kim Kardashian Instagram post went up and the FDA issued a Warning Letter to Duchesnay, the company she was representing, a couple of things have happened. For one, Kim has issued a corrective post (i.e., ad), which outlined the safety information for Diclegis, the medication for morning sickness she is promoting. And, two, according to Treato, a developer of software that helps life sciences companies listen in to what people are saying about their products on the web, Kim’s Instagram posts boosted the conversation around Diclegis by 500%. 

If reports are true that Kim charges $10,000 per post, there’s no question that it’s worth having her as a spokesperson for such a product, given her notoriety and social media following. But was the mistake of excluding the product’s risks worth a letter from the FDA? After all, once an act like this happens, you can be sure the FDA will be monitoring your activities much more closely.

One of the positive outcomes of this whole debacle is that pharma, biotech, and medical device companies have gained insight into the value of “customer listening” technology and services. Whether you’re “listening” to online conversations related to adverse events, product questions, or simply a brand, knowing what’s being said can help you address existing issues, head off potential issues, and gain insights that can steer your brand toward success in the market.

#CorrectiveAd I guess you saw the attention my last #morningsickness post received. The FDA has told Duchesnay, Inc., that my last post about Diclegis (doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine HCl) was incomplete because it did not include any risk information or important limitations of use for Diclegis. A link to this information accompanied the post, but this didn’t meet FDA requirements. So, I’m re-posting and sharing this important information about Diclegis. For US Residents Only. Diclegis is a prescription medicine used to treat nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in women who have not improved with change in diet or other non-medicine treatments. Limitation of Use: Diclegis has not been studied in women with hyperemesis gravidarum. Important Safety Information Do not take Diclegis if you are allergic to doxylamine succinate, other ethanolamine derivative antihistamines, pyridoxine hydrochloride or any of the ingredients in Diclegis. You should also not take Diclegis in combination with medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), as these medicines can intensify and prolong the adverse CNS effects of Diclegis. The most common side effect of Diclegis is drowsiness. Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or other activities that need your full attention unless your healthcare provider says that you may do so. Do not drink alcohol, or take other central nervous system depressants such as cough and cold medicines, certain pain medicines, and medicines that help you sleep while you take Diclegis. Severe drowsiness can happen or become worse causing falls or accidents. Tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Diclegis can pass into your breast milk and may harm your baby. You should not breastfeed while using Diclegis. Additional safety information can be found at www.DiclegisImportantSafetyinfo.com or www.Diclegis.com. Duchesnay USA encourages you to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

A photo posted by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on

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