Cloud

Windows Azure SQL Reporting

I’m not sure why exactly, but I have always loved SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS). If you didn’t already know it, I’m here to let you know that Windows Azure has a similar version called SQL Reporting. In everything I see about Windows Azure, SQL Reporting doesn’t seem to be talked about much. SQL Reporting doesn’t presently do everything you can do with SSRS, it is more like a younger sibling. The general look and feel from a user perspective is the same and for the most part the development is as well.

I think the only thing stopping SQL Reporting from wider adoption is the data sources currently supported. Presently SQL Reporting only supports a Windows Azure SQL Database as a data source. Though if you wanted you could run SSRS in a VM on Windows Azure. You can also connect your on-premises SSRS to SQL Databases.
Here is a comparison of SSRS and SQL Reporting from MSDN. You can also get more details about specific features that aren’t supported in SQL Reporting by going to the previously referenced MSDN article.

Feature
Windows Azure SQL Reporting
SQL Server Reporting Services
Design tools
Report Designer in SQL Server Data Tools
Report Builder 3.0
Report Designer in SQL Server Data Tools
Report Builder 3.0
Data Sources
Windows Azure SQL Database
Built-in or customizable data sources.
Report Management and Delivery
Windows Azure Management Portal
Includes displaying reports and rendering reports to multiple formats
Reports can be viewed in browsers, Report Viewer
Windows Forms and ASP.NET applications.
Use Report Manager for native mode or SharePoint application pages for SharePoint integrated mode
Includes displaying reports, rendering reports to multiple formats, creating subscriptions and scheduled deliveries, managing cached reports and shared datasets
Reports can be viewed in browsers, Report Viewer Windows Forms and ASP.NET applications, and in SharePoint web parts.
Extensibility
No extensions are supported in this release.
Custom extensions for data, processing, rendering, delivery, and security
Security Model
Windows Azure SQL Database username and password authentication are required for data access.
SQL Reporting username and password are required for report access.
Permissions to reports and report-related items are controlled by role assignment.
Windows authentication and other authentications are supported.
Permissions to reports and report-related items are controlled by role assignment.

 
What do you think of Windows Azure SQL Reporting?
By the way, if you need a Windows Azure subscription, here is the link for a free trial.

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Ryan Duclos

Ryan Duclos is a Lead Technical Consultant and CSM for Perficient, Inc. (PRFT), where he is passionate about Microsoft development utilizing the .Net Framework, SQL Server, and Microsoft Azure technologies. Ryan was a 2014 Microsoft MVP for Microsoft Azure. He lives and works in LA (Lower Alabama!) and loves spending time with his family, as well as being a Community Influencer for Microsoft. Ryan also a passion for Disc Golf and CrossFit! Ryan is a board member for the Lower Alabama .NET User Group and is also involved with the Pensacola SQL Server User Group, as well as other technical communities in his region. In addition, Ryan is a frequent speaker at numerous Code Camps, SQL Saturday & User Group events.

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