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Archive for the ‘Digital’ Category

What Does This Icon Mean?

In his blog What Happens When You Push the Broccoli Button? Brian Flanagan brought up a great point about iconography.  A few hours later after reading it, I misinterpreted the meaning of an icon on a website. I showed the icon to Claire, a co-worker, who guessed something completely different would happen upon clicking the icon than I did, yet we were both wrong. Inspired by this coincidence, I’d like to know what you think the icon means.

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Design for Users with Limited Literacy Skills (UXPA 2015)

mobileI was surprised to know that designing for people with various forms of literacy issues would benefit literate users. In one study presented in a session I am now attending, I learned it does! Another surprise, about 50% of U.S. citizens report some type of literacy problem. As a result, when we think about digital transformation and designing for multi-channel usage (especially mobile), there are some things we need to know to help our clients understand the wide range of users who are using their digital products, for example…

– Literacy issues are often merely a result of “situational literacy.” For example, health data is very domain specific and people are often more overwhelmed trying to understand a diagnosis, to sort through health plan coverage or to follow directions for how to take and submit a lab sample. Read the rest of this post »

5 ways learning to code can improve your life

 

Image of scripting codeMy first crack at writing computer code came when computers were sofa-sized and the term “web” applied mainly to spiders. At my high school, programming was the alternative elective to woodworking and home economics. It wasn’t popular; throughout my four years there, I could count on my fingers and toes the total number of students who took the course.

Today, my grade-school-age nieces and nephews can field coding questions that eluded me until well past college, and each year the starting age of coders keeps sliding lower.

This is the new normal. Children who barely know how to tie their shoes are acquiring the literacy demanded by our increasingly digital world. Before this decade ends, a whole generation of educated Americans will pass from kindergarten through college without ever touching a pen or pencil, or a piece of paper.

Meanwhile, adults who raise these savvy students still lag in this key area of digital literacy two decades after the Internet dawned. Most are clueless about the code that shapes their world. This cluelessness is bracketed by reluctance and intimidation – at first glance, coding does not look easy, so obviously it isn’t easy, right?

On the contrary. Websites such as Codeacademy, Khan Academy, and W3Schools remove much of the guesswork with step-by-step tutorials and workspaces that show what the code displays as it’s typed. Apps including Hopscotch, Lightbot, and Udacity’s series of Android and iOS training tools cross age groups and knowledge levels and are designed to match the comfort level of each.

These user-friendly tools are making code approachable, even fun – much more fun than slogging through those disturbingly dense manuals that were the primary coding assets in my youth.

With that fun comes something else: an education that extends well beyond the scope of coding’s intent. Learning to code also promotes:

Literacy Software has become a linchpin in our lives. Many daily tasks – from watching TV to making toast to turning on a water faucet – rely on devices that in turn rely on software. While it’s not necessary for each of us to know exactly how coding operates any of these things, an appreciation for the analytical process that went into the software programming opens our minds to the way digital devices “think,” thus raising a broader digital awareness that enables us to make software more responsive.

Problem solving That analytical process derives from computational thinking, an approach to solving large problems by breaking them down into smaller ones. We’re introduced to this kind of thinking early in school to solve basic math problems and expand upon it later to tackle business, engineering, science, music, project management – anything that deals in abstractions. Learning code hones that thinking because it requires a systematic approach essential to problem solving.

Personal growth At first, my interest in learning to code was blunted by fear of failure (Everyone starts out writing bad code; it’s unavoidable). I dreaded the prospect of typing line after line of code only to see the wrong result – or worse, no result. This prompted me to code with care and check my work at each step. Of course, I still failed with predictable regularity, but I was slowly steeling myself against disappointment knowing the amount of care I exercised. Today’s code-training tools mitigate that kind of fear by showing results in real time. They don’t, however, mitigate the failure chronic to solution-based code writing; that comes from the exacting task of writing and rewriting the code until it’s correct.

Community Nobody I know who can code well learned by themselves. Sure, they sifted through manuals and guides at some point in their education. But the lasting lessons and best solutions to problems came through asking questions, working in groups, and studying others’ successes and failures. Despite the stereotypical image of the solitary coder hunched over a dusty keyboard, illuminated only by the screen’s glow, coding is a communal effort shared across a room or across a continent. So, it’s safe to say the best programs are developed with precise amounts of code and liberal amounts of collegiality. As content strategist Anthony Wing Kosner said, “Once you write something as code, others who can read code can evaluate it and see if you indeed have a unique idea that can generate value.”

Change – Digital awareness, critical and computational thinking, unwavering determination, and a willingness to reach out to others – these are qualities that effect change in an office, a business, an industry. The more we know about our digital world, the more likely we can make it more responsive, and more responsible. As with anything else, big changes start with the little details – such as learning how to write computer code.

Lessons Learned from an Accessibility Summit

AccessU Summit

Last week I participated in AccessU Summit, a daylong online conference sponsored by Knowbility and Environments for Humans. I have ‘sketched out’ some of the key ideas I took from each session, and I’ve grouped them into sections to steer you in the direction of the material that interests you the most. In addition to these, there are 3 more sessions that I will post next week. Also, I will share recordings from the sessions when they are available. My raw notes are on the Research SharePoint site.

“Developer” Sessions…

Web Accessibility Essentials Using WAI-ARIA and HTML5

Eric Eggert, Member of W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative / slides: http://is.gd/4n299k

Eric previewed many codes samples (see slides) and then showed code working in Chrome.  As he ran this demo, Eric pointed out that people using assistive readers are used to hearing prompts such as “new menu item 1 of 3.” Eric showed several W3C tutorials, and highlighted the “why it’s important” justifications. Eric stated the obvious, it’s more effort to design to these standards, and yet it’s a standard to design to. Also, Eric uses Chromebox, as a screen-reader testing environment He said, “It’s not perfect but mostly works okay.”

Getting Ahead of the Curve: Scalable, Accessible, Enterprise-class Video on the Web  

John Foliot, Co-chair of W3C Accessibility of HTML5 Media Elements / slides: http://is.gd/ZAbcn1

I took from John’s talk that the future of video will be more extended dialogues (i.e., windows) with extended descriptions that a user can access by pausing and viewing the details. Also, he said that “clean audio” is coming, an option users can take to mute unnecessary background sounds. John provided some great resources for how to handle captioning. More vendors are offering this service so it’s driving down costs. There is video captioning software (DIY approach), and John recommended going with a service because using software is more laborious than a service, but less expensive. Video description software is out there and John recommended it to save time. Read the rest of this post »

Designing for accessibility does no one any favors

Book

For some time now I have contemplated, as a design practitioner, is my perception of design for users inclusive, empathic and universal? This has been nagging at me for some time. Actually it’s been calling my name, Psst. Lisa, you’re behind the curve in your understanding of designing the user experience for people that are, well, disabled.” Let me be more candid; my own perception of disabled people hasn’t been accurate, empathic or inclusive of the various impaired users attempting to access and benefit from the online world. My thinking on this topic needed a significant update, a DIY project in the making.

To start, I didn’t have an accurate definition of disabled people, nor of impairment. To my credit I had read the important book Design meets disability about two years ago. The author, Graham Pullin, raised my awareness of several issues and possibilities when designing for disabled people. For one, he helped me understand that disabled people is an appropriate expression “in the context of an environment or society that takes little or no account of impairment.” This is a troubling thought – “people disabled by the society they live in” due to the “designed” barriers and restrictions that limit participation in hmmm…life.  Read the rest of this post »

Less PowerPoints, More Prototypes

At the 2015 Adobe Summit, Todd Copeland of the National Australia Bank described how his organization is able to deliver digital experiences with the speed and velocity that customers expect. As Todd stated, “it’s a pretty simple equation: Less PowerPoints and More Prototypes. Less detailed specifications to justify business cases and more iterative customer testing.”

That “simple equation” is one of the key principles that is driving digital transformation. In today’s world, organizational velocity wins. Companies that are quick to adapt and respond to customers have a clear advantage. Those that are slow to respond are subject to digital disruption (see Blockbuster). In order to effectively compete, organizations must find ways to provide better customer experiences more efficiently. Enter Lean UX.

Lean UX abandons the idea of deliverables as milestones in favor of a progressive working model developed across multiple sprints. This is an important concept when you think about organizational velocity. Because deliverables eat up time. There is time required to create the deliverable, time to develop a presentation around the deliverable, time to present the deliverable and time to review and revise the deliverable. That is time that could be spent developing the actual solution. Lean UX enables the designers and developers to work collaboratively to establish a shared understanding without the need for detailed specifications or other paper-based deliverables. It also promotes transparency and trust, which can lead to a better solution.Lean UX Model
The Lean UX process involves 3 core steps:

  • Think: In the think stage, designers, developers and business owners collaborate on a particular problem and sketch out ideas for the solution. The goal is to get the core components of the solution visualized quickly so the development team can provide insights on the direction of the design, including feasibility. The initial investment in sketching is so minimal that there is no significant cost to completely rethinking the direction.
  • Make: Once a general direction is agreed upon, the team elaborates upon the solution through interactive prototypes. The interactive prototypes define the layout, functionality, relative importance or priority of information of the user interface and allow the team to experience the solution faster.
  • Test: Once the prototype is developed, it can be used to test the effectiveness of the design. By conduction usability testing sessions with representative users, the team can collect valuable feedback that will improve or enhance the solution. Based on the feedback received in the usability testing, the team makes revisions to the design concepts. And the cycle continues until all features and functionality are designed an incorporated into the working model.

Through this approach, a small, focused team can quickly prototype a working model that demonstrates the solution within a matter of weeks, instead of months. That difference is huge in terms of velocity, and may be the difference between meeting expectations and leaving your customers dissatisfied.

 

The Connected Car Platform Conundrum

I recently completed some proof-of-concept work for a major automotive manufacturer and I have come to the realization that the automotive manufacturer’s approach to the concept of the “Connected Car Platform” is going to run into growing pains as the pace of mobile innovation continues unabated.

One of first issues I ran into was that I did not own any of the client’s vehicles so I could not develop against an actual head unit but instead, had to use a head unit emulator.  Each manufacturer has their own head unit (that is the screen in the dash and all the associated systems that controls the music and any information displayed on the screen) with their own custom software and approach to connectivity.  This requires a mobile developer to work with aconnected_car multitude of manufacturer’s SDKs in order to have their mobile app work with any number of vehicle platforms.  The current state of the world in terms of mobile development for car platforms is very similar to what we found ourselves at a number of years ago when you were trying to decide how to support four or five different mobile platforms (iOS, Android, Microsoft, Blackberry and maybe Symbian).

Either you choose the top two or three, depending on the size of your development staff or looked at an expensive alternative such as Verivo. For the small mobile developer or development team, are you only going to support Ford and GM, leaving out all the other vehicle platforms? That might have worked in the 50s when GM and Ford dominated the automotive landscape, similar to what iOS and Android do in mobile today but not now.  There are initiatives such as the Open Automotive Alliance, however, their goal is to bring Android Auto to vehicles.  That cuts out the iOS platform and for families like mine who are blended (I have an Android phone but the rest of my family has iPhones), that won’t work.  Apple has come out with CarPlay but again, supporting that platform in a vehicle cuts out the Android consumer. Read the rest of this post »

Designing the small details – “Microinteractions”

Dan Saffer's text

Dan Saffer’s text

Part 1 of 2

As a usability researcher it’s important for me to stay aware and informed of guidelines for designing user interactions. Also, I want to be literate about topics within user experience design. So Dan Saffer’s book Microinteractions – Designing with Details caught my attention. His text is interesting; it focuses on the importance of the small details, the small pieces of functionality within a digital design. Saffer thinks these small details are really important because they can be “signature moments” that impact the entire experience of a product. Now that I’ve read his book, I would agree. To illustrate his perspective Saffer has included numerous examples of when a microinteraction created an enduring signature moment, for example Larry Tesla’s creation of Copy/Paste in 1973, and a lackluster one, “the initial intrigue with Google + Circles fell flat against Facebook when sorting users into circles became tiresome and gimmicky.”

What are Microinteractions?

I have to agree with Saffer on the importance of the details in designing, but it’s difficult to always know which design elements are microinteractions. As Saffer would say they “are all around us, from the turning on of an appliance to logging into an online service.” And, these “small pieces of functionality,” as simple and brief as they are, can delight or frustrate us over and over with every interaction. I can think of a situation in which I experienced the feeling of frustration when I had to log into a retail site to access tracking details on my purchase. This merchant’s microinteraction “rule” wasn’t a wise choice because it sacrificed my user experience by adding unnecessary complicatedness. It could have been much easier with an email that contained the shipper’s tracking number linked to the carrier’s site. Read the rest of this post »

For Enlightened CIOs, the “I” Stands for Insight

Who’s the most important marketing person at your company? Your CMO? Someone on her team? Maybe your CEO? What about your CIO? While your Chief Information Officer isn’t likely to craft your next campaign, the impact he or she has on customer experience is becoming more direct and more critical every day.

shutterstock_234372760The reason is simple, and it has to do with insight. More and more, CIOs and their teams hold the keys to unlocking the customer understanding that designers and marketers crave. A convergence of trends — abundant customer data, demand for greater insight in defining and managing customer experiences and a growing need to empathize with a wider range of customers — are driving CIOs into the insights business. A question remains, however, in how effective marketing and IT teams will be in working together to uncover customer data and convert it into meaningful actions.

Insight into customer behavior is what separates good customer experiences from bad. Insight drives empathy, a raw ingredient in the effort to humanize technology and harness its brand-building potential. The astute use of customer insight is so vital that we include it as one of seven factors in Perficient’s CXIQ Assessment, our measure of an organization’s customer experience maturity. While every company offers its customers an experience, few understand what it takes to systematically turn customer insight into the superior experiences that lead to increased preference and loyalty.

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Project Off Track? Why Client, Agent and User Balance is Critical

From a PM/AM perspective, we are expected to keep the client happy (fulfill their objectives and vision), be the voice for our internal team and help produce a relevant and useful product while staying on time and in budget. Neglecting one and overdoing the others can cause issues with the overall success of the project, ultimately placing strain on the client relationship and internal morale. Catering to the client only can result in delivering a product solely focused on business objectives. This tends to overlook the user’s satisfaction, delays development and produces a less than successful product. It is our job to figure out what those objectives are and how they translate to the end-user. On the flip side, if we as the agency look out for our sole interests, rogue creativity may result in irrelevancy and dismiss the client’s primary business objectives. There is a balance, but how do we get there?

There was a similar discussion in the book, SCRUM: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time, which sparked my interest on the topic. In software/web development, teams can be overwhelmed with a never-ending list of requirements that become irrelevant and outdated as the project develops, and they tend to serve more as roadblocks. Features become wasteful and not needed. These requirements are gathered at the beginning of the project and are thought to be essential to success. Things change, however, and we must be willing to be flexible.

To get to the overall purpose and desired outcome, we need to prioritize with our clients and internally: what is important, what is a must have, what is a nice to have, and what can get left out all together?

Look at the requirements through the lens of the Kano model, a method that has helped me wrangle in my own grandiose ideas.

Must-be Quality – Expected qualities of a deliverable. (The table stands up – woo hoo!)

One-dimensional Quality – User is satisfied when achieved, dissatisfied if not. (Table says it raises up and down. It does not – boo!)

Attractive Quality – Not expected or desired but a bonus. (Table was also made with recycled tires – cool) If it wasn’t, still cool table.

Indifferent Quality – Neither good nor bad, doesn’t really make much of a difference.

Reverse Quality – Too many features/options, not all customers are alike. (Table can also fold into a sofa, a ping-pong table, a sled and be used as a trampoline. I just want to put my computer on it!)

I’ll never forget a project that was delayed for one small feature that eventually was removed anyway. At the time for the client, they thought it was the make-or-break feature for the site. They had lost sight of their goals which cost them in the long run. (Of course, I tried to stop them, they just wouldn’t listen…LOL)

My Favorite Example of an Indifferent Quality

“Think about it: when was the last time you used Visual Basic Editor in Microsoft Word? …But it’s there, and someone spent time implementing it, but I guarantee you, it doesn’t increase the value of Word by much”

Here are two projects with the same intention (success and increased usage), yet two very different results:

FAIL: Windows 8 Metro UI

windows metro screen

Here is a unique example of having the user experience in mind, so they thought. The Metro worked very well across mobile, tablets and the Xbox interface. The move to PC caused confusion as they forgot to examine what the experience would be like for the user and focused more on the continuity of look/feel between devices. Hidden gestures, a clunky start screen and other usability issues put the desktop user last, not remembering that desktop browsing is still very relevant. It solved the problem for creating the same interface to multiple devices, which is more of a design conflict, not solving a real problem for the user.

YAY: McDonald’s App (Netherlands)

mcdonalds_2

This UX team had great attention to detail on what the users wanted (locations with directions, relevant coupons, favorites, build a meal with nutritional values) while still meeting the business needs. The app had delivered on its KPI’s, impact on sales. 2.1% of all McDonald’s customers brought in a mobile coupon, and there was a 47% increase in spending through upsells using the coupons. On top of that, it was the #1 download in the app store and Google play, downloaded by more than 1 million Dutch consumers, according to UX Magazine.

This thinking can be used throughout the project cycle; there is not one definitive moment that it is more useful than another. Project is off track? Look at where you are in the development cycle. What can be removed? Does it still have the same effectiveness without it? Will it still remain relevant and useful to the user? As we all know, projects are evolving pieces of work and have elements of upkeep to them. Does the product still engage the user? Have the business metrics flat-lined? Are there new technologies/techniques that we have access to now that will make this better? Moral of the story: take a step back from the chaos and reflect on what it is that you are trying to accomplish and how you are trying to get there.