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Webinar: Ensuring a Successful SharePoint Migration to the Cloud

Last week, at Microsoft’s Worldwide Partner Conference, it was mentioned that there are one billion Microsoft Windows and Office users today, and Office 365 is Microsoft’s fastest growing business in its history. At Perficient, we are definitely seeing this. Our customers are using Office 365 more than ever, from SharePoint to Exchange and Lync to Yammer and Power BI. webinar - internet education concept

That being said, when it comes to SharePoint, if you are considering moving your on-premises SharePoint environment to the cloud, you aren’t alone. There are a plethora of reasons to make the move – with Office 365, SharePoint is easy to manage, has enhanced security, and is accessible from just about anywhere. To add to that, you have OneDrive for Business, you can extend the collaborative nature of SharePoint with Yammer, and you can find tons of SharePoint apps in the Office Store  to extend functionality.

If your company is considering such a move, and you want to learn more, join us on Thursday, August 14, at 1 p.m. CT for a webinar, Best Practices for a Successful SharePoint Migration or Upgrade to the Cloud. During the session, Jason Bell, senior solution architect and SharePoint guru at Perficient, will show you how to make the migration process less daunting, including key details needed for a successful migration to Office 365. He’ll also cover: Read the rest of this post »

Partner Spotlight – Metalogix Diagnostic Manager

Perficient has many great partners that support our development and deployment of the best of breed solutions we provide for our clients. This post is the second in a series that will highlight some of the products available from our partners. Today, I’ll be presenting Metalogix and their Diagnostic Manager for SharePoint. 91583_Metalogix_Logo2011

Metalogix Diagnostic Manager ensures SharePoint performance and availability at all times. It monitors SharePoint content and servers from a single console, quickly identifying , diagnosing, and resolving problems before users even notice. It also provides critical planning information by storing size, count, and performance data of both servers and stored objects. Diagnostic Manager also monitors SharePoint in real-time, enabling administrators to quickly pinpoint performance and availability issues with servers, resources, HTML controls, web parts, and web controls.

Key Features

  • Preventative Care, Not Just Emergency Care

Diagnostic Manager provides constant insight to your server and content performance. It continuously monitors, diagnoses, discovers, analyzes and resolves SharePoint performance and availability issues.

  • Diagnose Without Delay

Read the rest of this post »

Virtualizing SharePoint 2013 Workloads

Most new SharePoint 2013 implementations these days run on virtual machines, and the question on whether to virtualize SQL servers has been long put to rest. Indeed, with the new Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V VM specs of up to 64 vCPUs, 1 TB RAM and 64 TB data, it is  hard to make a case for physical hardware.

Both Microsoft Hyper-V and VMware have published recommendations for working with virtualized SharePoint farms. The list of recommendations is long (and somewhat tedious), so this cheat-sheet aims to summarize the most important ones and provide real-world advice for SharePoint and virtualization architects.

  • When virtualizing SharePoint 2013, Microsoft recommends minimum of 4 and maximum of 8 CPU cores per VM. Start low (4) and scale up  as needed. With multiprocessor virtual machines, the physical host needs to ensure enough physical CPU cores are available before scheduling threads execution of that particular VM. Therefore, in theory the higher the number of vCPUs, the longer potential wait times for that VM. In every version starting 4.0, VMware has made improvements to the CPU scheduling algorithm to reduce the wait time for multiprocessor VMs using relaxed co-scheduling. Still, it’s wise to consult documentation on your particular version and see what are the specific limitations and recommendations.

 

  • Ensure true high availability by using affinity rules.  Your SharePoint admin should tell you which VM hosts which role, and you will need to keep VMs with same role on separate physical hosts.  For example, all VMs that host the web role should not end up on the same physical host, so your typical mid-size 2 tier farm should look something like this:

VMAffinity

  • When powering down the farm, start with the web layer, and work your way down to the database layer. When powering up, go in the opposite direction

 

  • Do not over oversubscribe or thin-provision PROD machines, do oversubscribe and thin-provision DEV and TEST workloads

 

  • NUMA (non-uniform memory access) partition boundaries: The high-level recommendation from both Microsoft and VMware is not to cross NUMA boundaries. Different chip manufacturers have different definitions of NUMA, but the majority opinion seems to be that NUMA node equals physical CPU socket, and not CPU core. For example, for a physical host with 8 quad-code CPUs and 256 GB of RAM, a NUMA partition is 32 GB. Ensure that individual SharePoint VMs will fit into a single partition i.e. will not be assigned more than 32 GB or RAM each.

 

  • Do not use dynamic memory: Certain SharePoint components like search and distributed cache use memory-cached objects extensively and are unable to dynamically resize their cache when the available memory changes. Therefore, dynamic memory mechanisms like minimum/maximum RAM, shares, ballooning driver etc. will not work well with SharePoint 2013. Again, your SharePoint admin should provide detailed design and advise which VM hosts which particular service.

 

  • Do not save VM state at shutdown or use snapshots in PROD: SharePoint is transactional application and saving VM state can lead to inconsistent topology after the VM comes back up or is reverted to a previous snapshot.

 

  • Disable time synchronization between the host and the VM: Same as previous point. All transaction events are time stamped, and latency during time synchronization can cause inconsistent topology. SharePoint VMs will use the domain synchronization mechanism to keep local clocks in sync.

 

  • Do not configure “always start machine automatically”: There may be cases where SharePoint VM is shut down for a reason, and starting it automatically after physical host reboot can cause problems.

 

  • TCP Chimney offload: Please refer to this VMware post on reasons why this setting may need to be disabled. This is not a setting unique to SharePoint and unless it is the standard practice for all web VMs or is part of the image, it should not be configured.

 

  • When configuring disaster recovery, virtualization has been a godsend for quite some time. Using VM replication to a secondary site is by far the simplest SharePoint DR scenario to configure and maintain.

 

  • Other settings that are not SharePoint-specific : things like storage host multi-pathing, storage partition alignment, physical NIC teaming, configuring shared storage for vMotion etc. hold true for all VMware implementations

 

 

How to Speed up a Slow People Picker in SharePoint

Manjeet Singh, Lead Technical Consultant at Perficient, recently wrote a blog post about issues relating to a slow People Picker in SharePoint.

Have you experienced problems with People Picker taking too long to find a user? Almost a minute or may be more. Does your SharePoint Environment functions with multiple domains?
One of the reasons for sluggish behavior of people picker is the People Picker property called “SearchActiveDirectoryDomains” which usually scopes the entire AD with its sub trees and trusted AD’s while searching for the users account.

In his post, Manjeet details the step-by-step process to fix this issue. You can read the entire blog post here.

Office 365 – SharePoint Online Admin Overview

One of the best benefits to Office 365 is the continuous updates and improvements to the platform. We no longer need a sever release, service pack, or hotfix. We get new releases when Microsoft is ready to make them live in the cloud. Recently, we’ve gotten Document Conversations and Office for iPad; and we will be seeing Office Graph and Olso some time this calendar year. Microsoft recently rolled out a new Office 365 For Business Roadmap, where you can keep an eye on upcoming service releases.

SharePoint Central Administration Featuresadmin3

Every SharePoint Administrator is used to operating in Central Admin, the Office 365 SharePoint Admin experience provides some of that same functionality -

  • Site Collections – full up management of all site collections, quotas, permissions, and recycle bin.
  • User Profiles – manage user properties, manage user profiles, setup MySites, etc.
  • BCS – manage BDC models and external content types, manage connections
  • Term Store – our ever familiar Term Store Management Tool
  • Records Management – formally known as Send To locations
  • Search – manage schema, result sources, query rules, search center settings, etc.
  • Secure Store – create new target applications
  • Apps – app catalog, purchase apps, manage licenses, etc.

In addition to these normal administration features of SharePoint, we have a number of features that only apply to the Office 365 SharePoint Online environment.

Top Navigation Bar User Experience

One of the recent additions to the service, these options provide the ability to show/hide the OneDrive for Business, Yammer/Newsfeed, and Sites links from the Office 365 Suite Bar. This is a great new feature for those customers who are not yet ready to roll out the full suite of cloud services. This is a great instance of Microsoft listening to its customers. Moving to the cloud can be complicated, and sometimes its necessary to roll features out incrementally. This new Admin feature enables that. Read the rest of this post »

Office 365 Feature Rollout and First Release Program

FrustatedDid you always feel Office 365 has been going through rapid updates and you as a customer or partner are left with no insight? Until now Microsoft has been rolling out features without regard to the tenant profile. There is generally no process for partners to get updates before or after customers. I personally know of multiple instances where it’s been a nightmare for organizations to keep track of and stay informed of all the changes, left alone the communication to their end users.

Microsoft has taken the first step by coming out with a new feature called “First Release” Program.  This will allow anyone (customer or partner) to be in the front of the line for a small subset of significant updates. The program is scoped to Exchange and SharePoint features and I hope they expand to more capabilities. Each tenant can choose to be in the First Release group or in standard release to determine when they get the select list of releases. If you’re responsible for a number of different organizations tenants, you may persuade them to keep First Release turned off, so that you get early warning and experience. Then you’ll be able to support them more knowledgeably.

Note: Yammer is NOT part of this program

With Office 365, you get product updates – like new email features, more site storage, and new collaboration features – as they become available. You can decide when to receive the updates by opting in to the First Release program or remaining on the Standard Release program.

First Release

FirstRelease

With this option, you and your users receive a select set of significant service updates as early as one week after the official announcement. Choose this option if you and your

employees are comfortable with regular updates to the Office 365 service.

Standard Release

StandardRelease

With this default option, you and your users receive a select set of significant service updates 3 weeks or more after the official announcement. For at least 3 weeks, you have time to learn about the updates and prepare your employees.

How to take benefit of this new feature?

1. Go to your Tenant portal

2. Go to Admin > Service settings > Updates.

3. Turn First Release on or off.

One another widespread frustration we usually experience is when users in an organization on the same tenant see different updates on the UI.  This is due to the fact that it is an ongoing upgrade and is not completed yet. The users in one Office 365 organization are located on different server farms and the update is performed not by Office 365 organization; the new patches are deployed on the server farms. This is the reason why not all users in a company can see the new feature (for e.g. toolbar). While the upgrade is ongoing it is normal that some colleagues of yours still don’t have the feature available. An update might take up to 2 months and after this time passed all users in your organization should see already the feature available.

SharePoint Online – When to use Content Search vs Content Query

Some of you may be doing a double take. Wait, is this post really about the Content By Query Web Part? Didn’t that die with the release of the Content By Search Web Part? In short, no! There are a few use cases where the Content By Query web part is still very useful – and necessary!!

What is the Content By Query Web Part?cbq1

First introduced in SharePoint Server 2007, the Content By Query (CBQ) web part allows you to display data from multiple lists in one web part. Going back to SharePoint Portal Server 2001, there was no mechanism to collate information together from various lists and libraries. There were List View Web Parts, but those only displayed information from a singular list. When Microsoft released the CBQ web part, it was revolutionary to the platform. It introduced the ability to style and customize the web part via XSLT - that the time, the latest and greatest technology. For more information, please see this MSDN article.

What is the Content By Search Web Part?

First introduced in SharePoint 2013, the Content By Search Web Part (CSWP) enables the new SharePoint Search Driven Architectures – meaning this web part displays information from the Search Index. The CSWP also displays results in a way that you can easily format. A new feature called Display Templates are used to style the results of a CSWP. Display templates are snippets of HTML and JavaScript that render the information returned by SharePoint. The information to be displayed gets inserted into the page in JSON format. There is also a wonderful GUI for building and configuring the CSWP. The query engine is extremely powerful, allows for almost any customization, and is extremely user friendly – no code knowledge required. The GUI will also show the results of the query so you can preview the data and ensure it’s getting pulled correctly.

When to use Content By Search or Content By Query?

The CSWP can return any content from the search index. Use it on your SharePoint 2013 sites when you are connecting to a Read the rest of this post »

Webinar Recap: SharePoint 2013 Hybrid Scenarios That Make Sense

Cloud services like Office 365 and SharePoint Online are becoming an increasingly popular alternative to an on-premises SharePoint solution. However, many organizations are deciding that their best bet is to deploy specific solutions in Office 365, while keeping other workloads in their on-premises SharePoint environment. Certain hybrid scenarios make sense, and others don’t.

This past Wednesday, we held a webinar on that exact topic – SharePoint Hybrid Scenarios That Make Sense: Optimizing Your SharePoint and Office 365 Investment.  During the session, Jason Bell, a senior solution architect, and Matt Barman, a client director, both of whom work within Perficient’s Microsoft practice, shared their experience working with SharePoint in a hybrid environment.

The two began by explaining what SharePoint hybrid is, followed by the strengths of SharePoint Online and workloads best suited for the cloud. They followed this by covering best practices, and lastly, they shared two examples of Perficient clients who have deployed SharePoint hybrid, and their specific situations.

There were many great questions that came in during the session, and Matt and Jason wrapped up with enough time to answer a good portion of them. For the full webinar replay, including the Q&A portion, click here.

If you want to hear from one of our clients on their decision to deploy SharePoint Online to collaborate, join us on Wednesday, June 25 for a webinar with FirstGroup. During that session, they’ll discuss how SharePoint Online is being used to share across five divisions (one being Greyhound) and the impact it’s expected to have across the organization. Perficient’s Chris Hines will also talk about both the benefits and challenges of SharePoint Online. Click here to register.

Developing for Office 365 and SharePoint

Recently I participated in a Microsoft developer discussion on the Yammer Network where some great ideas were shared. I am re posting a summary of the session posted in that group here for everyone’s benefit

——————————–

Overview: Microsoft responses to questions are provided by Chris Johnson, Sonya Koptyev, Jeremy Thake, Dorrene Brown, Mauricio Ordonez, Brian Jones, Ricky Kirkham, Christophe Fiessinger, Jeremy Chapman, Alister Spiers, and 365 IT Pro Team as well as MVP Juan Carlos Gonzalez Martin.
 

FUTURE PLANS
Q: When will we see the O365 APIs move out of preview? When will we see the O365 APIs move out of preview?
A: We’re aiming for end of this calendar year. We’re getting a bunch of great feedback and have a few partners building solutions that have helped us identify some additional work we’d like to get in. We will have a public roadmap soon that we will be keeping up to date to help give people a heads up on when developer related features will be coming.

Q: Are there any plans in the SharePoint roadmap for an analytics API about user actions (like Usage or Audit data for SharePoint On-Prem)?
A: It is something that our Information Management team are working on. This is obviously challenging from a multi-tenant perspective due to the nature of where we have come from historically with the SharePoint platform

Q: Is there is any plans for Lync online API so we can schedule and add people to meetings from our custom application? 
A: We are working to expand our APIs across the suite, but we don’t have any announcements around the Lync Online APIs at this time.
 
Q: Can you please provide a little more insight around the plans for auto versus provider hosted apps and what is going to happen to Cloud Business Apps (light switch / html)? I understand provider hoist is the current guidance but I’d like to understand what the path will be so we can make some good architectural and strategic decisions for our apps in the near future – 3-6 months timeframe. We currently create, and have a need for small, dedicated task oriented apps that interact between Office 365 and SQL Azure.
A: The Auto-hosted apps preview program is closed (http://blogs.office.com/2014/05/16/update-on-autohosted-apps-preview-program and we will be allowing the apps to run until close to the end of the year. The guidance is to convert your auto-hosted apps (if you have any) to provider-hosted. That is the preferred app deployment model today. We cannot comment on the CBAs but can pull in the right folks to answer your questions around CBAs.

Q2: Are you working on a replacement for Autohosted Apps? Autohosted Apps were a really powerful App Type for creating and deploying small Apps without having to worry about deploying them in Azure.
A2: We heard from developers that they wanted to have full access to Azure, and so as we announced in the blog post we will continue to work with the Visual Studio team to continue to simplify and streamline the deploy process into Azure.

Q: Is there a plan to enhance the APIs available for administrative activies such as managing domains/DNS entries or modify Exchange/Lync/Sharepoint settings via APIs?
A: Our approach is to have management APIs via PowerShell + the remote APIs via REST/CSOM. We don’t currently have anything to share about new APIs coming to PowerShell about those specific things. We’re always looking to improve what can be automated! The big focus has been to make it easier through poweshell cmdlets… check them out on TechNet - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn194107.aspx

Q: Are there any plans to be more transparent about updates to the UI? Given that our development is focused on a client side API, any changes to the standard HTML can immediately render our solutions broken. For example — the top navigation bar’s text color recently changed. If my branding had used that color for the background color, the text would have been invisible. Even “non-disruptive” changes can be disruptive.
A: There is work in progress to be more transparent with our roadmap where we will share changes such as the user experience changes along with new and changed APIs.

The nature of us running a service now is that we are continually improving the user experience. With SharePoint On-Premises the user experience has changed between Cumulative Updates, Service Packs and major releases. As a SharePoint developer we have always had to manage this balance, taking a dependency from your code on the UI is a fragile one due to the frequency of change and we would recommend you avoid it at all costs.

With regards to the scenario you provided around the top navigation bar text color recently changing…the Theme approach is fully supported. I do agree that it is unfortunate that the text became invisible. We are working on some new features to improve this experience, but are not quite ready to disclose them

Q: Are there plans to make it easier for public facing and publishing sites to be Responsive ready? What can we look forward to?
A: Have you checked out this post about responsive web design in SharePoint? http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sharepointdev/archive/2013/04/01/implementing-your-responsive-designs-on-sharepoint-2013.aspx
Also, you can find additional information about designing public facing sites here: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-sharepoint-online-enterprise-help/public-website-faq-HA104135026.aspx#_Toc383417646

Q: CRM now supports multiple instances within a single Office 365 tenant. Will SharePoint receive this same capability in the future so that we can better manage Development and QA instances?
A: Currently SharePoint has the capability of creating different Site Collections in the same tenancy which is how some handle dev/QA areas to keep things separate. However, others choose to create an entirely separate tenancy to keep things separate.

In your case what are you looking for isolation of? Sites, User profiles? Mailboxes? All of the above? Keen to hear more about what you are looking for. Please log it on UserVoice: http://officespdev.uservoice.com/

Q: A request that we get from Office365 customers is hiding specific content from the suite bar. Are there any plans to implement customizing and hiding content? This would need to be consistent across all Office365 Services. 
A: We’ve also heard several times that customizing the suite bar is something that users want as well. While we aren’t quite ready to share our thinking just yet, this is something we are thinking about at this time.
 
APIs 
Q: How much change should we expect moving from the Preview APIs to the Production APIs?
How much notice will we get when this happens to make sure we can make adjustments in our code?
A: We don’t anticipate huge changes in the O365 APIs moving from preview to production. There will be changes to the APIs while they are still in preview, but we’ll make sure to let everyone know in advance. We are currently working on a 30-60-90 day roadmap for the public that will show people what will be changing in the near future.
 
Q: In the preview Office 365 Files Rest API what is the reasoning behind limiting file copy and move operations to only within the same document library? This really limits the usefulness of those operations and is less functionality than what is in the existing SharePoint web endpoints.
A: No reason other than we haven’t implemented the feature yet :) The Files APIs are still in preview mode, and while we can’t share the exact improvements we will be making this is definitely a good idea. Can you add this feature request to our UserVoice (aka.ms/officedevfeedback) so we can get it on our backlog?

Q: What is the relationship between the O365 APIs (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/office/dn605893) and SharePoint apps intended for SharePoint Online? Are SP apps going to be replaced (eventually) by the O365 APIs? If not, what scenarios are appropriate for SP Apps, but not for O365 APIs, and vice versa?
A: No, they are not replacing Apps for SharePoint. The way we see is that the Apps are the contextual experience of surfacing your customization into SharePoint and Office. Such as App Parts, Ribbon Custom Actions, List Item Block Actions in SharePoint or Read/Write Compose in Outlook and Content App in PowerPoint.

The Office 365 APIs are your way of reaching into the services (Calendar, Mail, Contacts, OneDrive for Business, SharePoint All Sites) from your standalone web applications or mobile applications.We see these two complementing each other to deliver your business solutions. We will be sharing more soon on this direction and strategy.

Q: From my SharePoint site can I call my custom for example WebAPI endpoint and use OAuth to authorize this call on the backend? I want to call external backend from JavaScript in my SharePoint site and just know the caller from my backend I don’t want to call back to SharePoint I will just get data from my backend and send it to the caller. 
A: We don’t think you can use the context token in that way. There’s no way to obtain a context token programmatically. What we would suggest for these JavaScript scenarios is that your WebAPI use an Auth cookie that gets sent in response to the initial context token.

GENERAL QUESTIONS AND FUNCTIONALITY 
Q: When will we get to know more about the Discovery Service? We work in integration, and knowing what’s out there instead of having to search for it would be extraordinarily helpful.
A:The Discovery Service allows applications to find the specific endpoint location for resources. For example, when a user signs into an application it can call the discovery service to determine URL of the user’s OneDrive. This saves the user from having to manually type in the URL. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/dn605898(v=office.15).aspx

Q: I’ve been having a lot of trouble figuring out leverage Office Web Apps as a provider hosted app. What’s the best path for third party companies wanting to give users the best web experience possible?
Is it possible to use Office Web Apps with a client dropbox account? Feed them a byte[] or some such action?
A: If the files are stored in O365, then you should be able to use the Web Apps to render the files. If the files are in dropbox, you’d need to first get them into the user’s OneDrive for business folder, and the Web Apps would then render them.

Q: What is the relationship of the O365 Common Consent Framework (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/dn605895(v=of…) to SharePoint apps? Assuming the app is targeted only for SharePoint Online, is the ComCon Framework and alternative to the existing ACS/OAuth system for SP app developers? Is it meant to replace the existing system?
A: The Common Consent Framework allows applications to access multiple services. Today the set of services supported by common consent includes SharePoint, Exchange, and the directory. In contrast, SharePoint app authorization model allows access solely to SharePoint resources. At SharePoint Conference 2014 we announced our direction is to converge these two models.
Right now you can actually already call the CSOM and REST APIs if your app asks for at least READ permissions that the user consents to. You can pass the Auth Bearer token as you make calls to both those APIs.

Q2: How would you use CSOM in an O365 APP? Would you use a token to establish a ClientContext?
A2: Yes, you can use CSOM completely out of SharePoint…there is a post of Kirk Evans where he shows how to create a Timer Job where you can see this idea.http://blogs.msdn.com/b/kaevans/archive/2014/03/02/building-a-sharepoint-app-as-a-timer-job.aspx
The Microsoft team is also working on getting out some simple blogs posts dealing with this particular subject.

Q: When developing Apps for Office 365 and the App Catalog: we may want to update our app from time to time. What resources are there to learn the best way to do this and could this potentially translate to On-Prem app updates? 
A: Ricky Kirkham did an amazing session on this at SharePoint Conference http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/SharePoint-Conference/2014/SPC425. Due to the app model not sitting on the SharePoint Server, the good news is that IISRESETs are not required that would impact the operational uptime of the SharePoint server.
There are naturally strategies just like any web applications of releasing new versions of your web app into production still. But it does not impact your SharePoint SLA now, just your app. We have several topics on MSDN about updating SP apps. The top node is: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/fp179904%28v=office.15%29.aspx. It is not necessary to stop SharePoint to update an app. Only the app itself is inaccessible while the update is running.

Q: Why is the Recycle method not exposed on SP.Web in CSOM? In order to recycle a web rather than delete it. I only see DeleteObject exposed where other objects such as SP.List have a Recycle method.
A: That would be a great one to add to user voice, and we can take a look at it. http://officespdev.uservoice.com

Q: Tenancy scope app can’t install app part. How I can create the concept of app stabling to my site and run code in the host web without needing to install an app and add my app part to the host web?
A: If it is a scenario when a user launches the home page of the host web and you want to execute some code and render something on the page,right now you would need to add the App to every Site where you wanted the App Part.
Right now you can’t automatically add the App Part to a page, we have an engineer investigating this scenario right now. In the future we intend on improving this scenario of deploying apps at a tenant level. If you just want to execute code against multiple host webs, have you can build a Standalone Web Application or Mobile Application that calls the Office 365 APIs.
 
Q: How to deal with the announcement of discontinuation of InfoPath in SharePoint? Is there any guidance or migration path?
A: Customers can still use InfoPath until 2023. We plan to release a replacement (side by side for now) with the SharePoint form customization technology, currently codenamed “FoSL” later this summer. We are also working actively on vNext technologies for other scenarios, and we will provide more details later this year, closer to Q4. http://blogs.office.com/2014/01/31/update-on-infopath-and-sharepoint-forms

Q2: Regarding the 2023 date… will this include InfoPath Forms Services or just InfoPath Desktop Client? Dates this far in the future would certainly impact a client’s decision.
A2: InfoPath Desktop Client will continue to be supported through 2023. InfoPath Forms Services in on-prem deployments will also continue to be supported until 2023. InfoPath Forms Services in SharePoint Online (Office 365) will be maintained until the next on-premises release of SharePoint. We will provide a year’s notice (via blog post) before turning off IPFS in the service.

Q: Will it be possible (or is it already possible) to use Word Online, Excel Online, etc from SharePoint Online as a drop in replacement for textarea/ckeditor html-fields in .Net/Azure web applications?
A: We currently have the ability to drop a document on a page and use Word Online to view it. However, we don’t have the ability to just use it as a generic rich text editing control like you would with the radEditor for example.

Q2: When you say drop a document on a page, do you mean a web page that is not within SharePoint Online (like a regular MVC-web application pages (for example a cshtml-page))? And does this solution require the users to login to SharePoint online also?
A2: Yes, that’s right. Auth depends on where the document sits. If it’s in Office 365, then yes, they would need to authenticate. You can also do the same with documents in OneDrive.

 

 

Source: Yammer IT Pro

Yammer 101 Series – Groups

What are Yammer Groups?
Groups are logical containers for sharing conversations, files and notes in Yammer based on a single business purpose or goal.

What are the benefits of Groups?
Groups are the foundation for organizing content in Yammer networks, providing immediate business value when collaborating.  Some of the benefits include:
1)  Targeting your message to the right people by posting updates to a central location
2)  Reducing email threads for project collaboration
3)  Providing an instant forum for recognition, company updates and sharing ideas with everyone or certain individuals
4)  Membership can be limited to a specific list of individuals or can include members outside of the company network.

Best Practices for managing Groups:
Effective Group management practices include:
-Adopt a group champion to stimulate conversations.
-Use more private groups to encourage less socially experienced people to engage in conversation without everyone in the company viewing their posts.
-Monitor group activity; it is more important to have a smaller number of relevant groups than many groups that are providing little business value.
-One Business purpose = One Yammer group.

Read the rest of this post »