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Posts Tagged ‘HIE’

Improve care coordination with direct secure messaging #HIMSS14

Direct secure messaging (DSM) is a transmission standard promoted by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology that meets the Meaningful Use Stage 2 requirements of electronic health records (EHRs).  It works much the same way as regular email, but the message is encrypted, which prevents unintended use of the protected health information that is included within.  DSM can be used to send patient information among physicians, among provider organizations and to other 3rd parties, including patients.  

shutterstock_157839875Healthcare providers have been using direct secure messaging for care coordinating for a while but there may be ways to use it more fully to reduce readmissions, reduce unnecessary testing and procedures and even increase provider productivity.  Some benefits may include:

  1. Providers can insert secure messages into any point of their workflow.
  2. Primary care providers can interact with specialists to potentially result in fewer referrals; ultimately reducing costs to the healthcare system.
  3. Hospitals can improve transitions to nursing facilities and nursing homes can improve the communication with providers to reduce the need for readmissions back to the hospital.
  4. Medical records departments can interact with the patient send their records more easily saving them time and money.
  5. Researchers can seamlessly interact with patients on release of health sciences information.

Once HIEs are fully implemented, query based networks will provide robust data exchanges, but DSMs will continue to be valuable especially for smaller practices and hospitals that do not have the means to implement sophisticated EHRs.  Read the rest of this post »

Creating a single best view of the patient #HIMSS14

As healthcare organizations prepare for full scale integration of electronic medical records through EHR and enterprise wide data warehouse initiatives, identity resolution is a priority for everyone. 

shutterstock_128624354A Master Person Index (MPI) is a solution intended to solve the common problem where multiple systems or applications within the organization gradually become inconsistent with the most current data.  When this information changes and only one system is updated, the MPI solution ensures that the change is propagated to all other systems to create the single best view.  The MPI may be found at the single system level, facility level, enterprise or health information exchange (HIE) level.  A “person” in the healthcare context may be a physician, patient, member, payers, etc.

Data management is one of my favorite subjects and I’m very excited about the evolution of MPIs for identity resolution, as well as, other Master Data Management solutions. But let’s focus on the benefits of the Master Person Index.  Read the rest of this post »

Healthcare CIOs are carefully moving to the cloud

Recently our company has increased our focus on what healthcare organizations are looking for when it comes to cloud computing, in large part due to our acquisition last year of two fantastic Salesforce partners (ClearTask and CoreMatrix). I found this article in Healthcare Informatics to be very interesting. It’s titled “The Many Flavors of the Cloud” and includes interviews with some key CIOs regarding how they view private vs. public cloud solutions and the sensitivity – and often the mandated security requirements – around health data when stored in the cloud.

There are some obvious advantages to providers moving to private cloud storage for all types of data across the organization, but also some critical considerations for any CIO or CMIO. Here are the key takeaways I got from this article.

MedicalImaging_AndroidTabletApp

Medical imaging takes up a lot of storage space in the healthcare space. Imagine a 24 hour study of your heart that takes up a terabyte of space. The cloud can enable better scale for this type of need.

Key insights about cloud computing in healthcare:

  • CIOs interviewed prefer “private cloud” solutions over public cloud solutions like those of Google, Amazon and Microsoft – more control around access & rules
  • CIOs don’t want to deal with power issues, cooling issues, and capitalizing hardware over time – 3 reasons they enjoy Cloud
  • They enjoy reduced costs in scaling a storage room, servers, etc..
  • CIOs take personal ownership over creating their own stringent security requirements for their cloud vendor, making them feel better about storing PHI or other sensitive healthcare data in it.

Read the rest of this post »

Massachusetts launches important next phase of HIE

Today, Masachusetts moved into phase 2 of a very important Health Information Exchange (HIE) project. It’s called Mass HIway Health Information Exchange, and it was announced at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where Healthcare CIO, John D. Halamka works.

John D. Halamka, MD, MS, is Chief Information Officer of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network (NEHEN), Co-Chair of the HIT Standards Committee, a full Professor at Harvard Medical School, and a practicing Emergency Physician.

John D. Halamka, MD, MS, is Chief Information Officer of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network (NEHEN), Co-Chair of the HIT Standards Committee, a full Professor at Harvard Medical School, and a practicing Emergency Physician.

Halamka is one of my favorite people to follow in healthcare technology (@jhalamka). He blogs at “Life as a Healthcare CIO” and wrote about the news today in a post titled “The Next Phase of Healthcare Information Exchange.”

Halamka gives us a sense of all of the work that went into this next stage of the project, including:

  • a patient index to track which patients have opted into exchanging their patient data with other providers
  • a portal for providers to log in and access the data
  • an EMR request system to support the request & release workflow
  • a system to keep audit trails of all of the activity

For those who are fans of a “No More Clipboards” type of future in their own patient care experience, news like this is very exciting. Halamka talks about how this massive project taking place in Massachusetts is an example of how the future of healthcare information exchange can be convenient, secure, and lead to better care and health outcomes for us all.

He writes:

“I can imagine a day in the next few years, when all patients in the Commonwealth, with their consent, benefit from secure, coordinated care.    My mother suffered a major medical error in California because of inaccessible primary care records.   I truly believe that my 20 year old daughter, attending Tufts University, will see significant reduction in preventable harm in Massachusetts during her 20′s.”

That’s very inspiring.

 

Top 5 Technology Trends in Healthcare – October 2013

The healthcare IT field is rapidly developing and changing. Emerging technology and updated regulations put pressure on healthcare providers and health plans to stay ahead of the curve. Perficient creates a monthly list that explores some of the current topics and issues in health IT. This list examines the most talked about issues and technologies that are currently affecting the industry.

 HCBlog Top5 Trends

Mobile Medical Applications

Last month, the FDA released its final guidance for developers of mobile medical applications. The FDA will focus on regulating potentially harmful apps instead of policing applications that pose minimal risk to consumers. These more harmful apps include those which are using mobile technology to make a specific diagnosis and those which transform mobile devices into a regulated medical device.

Patient Engagement and Connected Health

With the progression of patient engagement, consumers are looking to become involved in their own care and health. The quantified-self movement helps patients track their health, physical activity, food consumption, heart rate, and more. From mobile apps to worn digital sensors like the FitBit to implanted devices, patients keep track of their own health data – which eventually may be used to create a more personalized experience.

Read the rest of this post »

HIE: 6 Opportunities for Increased Patient Safety

In my last blog post we explored the topic of shared decision making (SDM) and its impact on patient safety. This made me think of an experience we recently had with my dad. He had a stent placed about year and a half ago to open a blocked artery in his left anterior descending artery (LAD). Now I should tell you that the doctors, 3 to be exact, wanted to send him home because all of his tests came back negative, but the stubborn, yet lovable, man that my father is (I know, the apple doesn’t far fall!), found a cardiologist that was willing to listen to him and discuss his concerns and thoughts. He convinced this cardiologist to do an angiogram. They ended up finding, clear as day, a 90% blockage in the LAD and stented him right then and there, no questions asked. Needless to say he bypassed a major heart attack, (a.k.a. the Widowmaker) which could have very easily ended his life.

My brother and I both have clinical backgrounds, so it was a little unsettling how the events of the 48 hours with my dad transpired. We went from an emergency admission to nothing is wrong with him, he can go home, to he has a 90% blockage in his main artery that we need to stent right away. Talk about an emotional rollercoaster, but in the HIE benefitsend we were glad he was okay. However, at time of discharge, another shocking and disappointing incident occurred. The nurse was going over his discharge medication regime. As she was rattling off this medication list at a speed even a pharmacist couldn’t understand, she stated, “…and 10mg of Amaryl two times a day.” My dad, who has NEVER taken a pill in his life (we are Indian so turmeric is our answer to everything!) and was still a little out of it from the whole experience was unable to catch the error that just occurred. Luckily I was there to ask the nurse, “Are you sure it is 10mg and not 1mg of Amaryl?” Her response, “Yes that is what the order states.” Again, I challenged her, “Are you sure, because I thought the cardiologist told us after surgery it was 1mg of Amaryl.” She responded, “I can go check, but I am pretty sure this is correct”. I asked her to call the cardiologist and confirm as pretty sure was not good enough. Just as I suspected, it was an error in dosage. The order was for 1mg of Amaryl, twice a day, specific to before breakfast and dinner. At this point, given all that occurred, I began questioning everything she rattled off and requested (well, damn near demanded) that she go back and reconfirm the entire list. This was my dad, my best friend, I was not going to take any chances that his safety be compromised due to a medication error.

This is just one incident that thankfully didn’t end badly.  However, every day patient safety is being compromised because information is not accurately or readily available.  Up to 18% of the patient safety errors, generally, and as many as 70% of adverse drug events could be eliminated if the right information about the right patient is available at the right time. Health information exchange (HIE) makes this possible1.”

Read the rest of this post »

The Quest for My Complete, Portable Health Record

As I have written before, I currently see several physicians who do NOT use an EMR in the office.  They are awesome diagnosticians, people and mentors but they have not taken the leap to the electronic health world.  Now, add in two hospital networks that do NOT have patient portals for accessing my records and you get one big, fat medical record quagmire!   I would love to have my entire medical record in one place AND have portable access to it.  Will I ever reach that goal?  Do I need to establish a relationship with a new physician just to obtain my goal?  I certainly hope not!  So what can be done to make my dream a reality?

puzzle personThis quest has certainly led me to devour insights from industry experts, read countless blogs and articles and consider the drastic move to a new physician.  So I was intrigued when I read the Wall Street Journal article, “Image Sharing Seeks to Reduce Repeat Scans”, this week.  Allowing patients to have access and the ability to TRANSFER images to multiple providers reduces cost, redundancy and ultimately, radiation exposure for the patient.  In addition, it allows the patient to “own” their health.  Although this is certainly a step in the right direction, this is an isolated sharing of information, not connected to the rest of the patient’s history, just another piece of the puzzle.  How can we solve the entire puzzle?

Read the rest of this post »

Top 5 Technology Trends in Healthcare – March 2013

The healthcare IT field is rapidly developing and changing. Emerging technology and updated regulations put pressure on healthcare providers and health plans to stay ahead of the curve. Perficient creates a monthly list that explores some of the current topics and issues in health IT. This list examines the most talked about issues and technologies that are currently affecting the industry.

HCBlog Top5

HIMSS 2013 Conference

Earlier this month the HIMSS 2013 Conference took place in New Orleans. Nearly 35,000 individuals attended the healthcare technology conference over the six days of sessions and exhibition. Highlights included a keynote address from former President Bill Clinton, an Interoperability Showcase, several Meaningful Use workshops, and a general theme of patient engagement.

Patient Engagement under Meaningful Use

A key theme of Stage 2 meaningful use is engaging patients in their own care. Building on the Stage 1 requirement that 50% of patients be able to view their documents electronically, Stage 2 mandates that 10% of those patients actually do so. Clinical summaries must be provided following each office visit and select patients will receive notifications and reminders for additional care. Secure messaging to patients, another Stage 2 requirement, can connect them with helpful care information.

Read the rest of this post »

HIMSS 2013: An Interview with ePatient Dave

Earlier this month at the HIMSS 2013 Conference, Perficient’s Liza Sisler spoke with Dave deBronkart, better known as ePatient Dave. Dave and Liza discuss the unique roles of health, care and medication in engaged healthcare and the idea that the patient is the key to bringing all three aspects together in order to provide better health outcomes. He also talked about the role of useful digital tools to help engage patients and interoperable systems allow data to be shared and presented in a useful manner, providing better, safer care. Dave talks about the idea that patient’s healthcare data should follow them as complete and correct data at the point of care is critical to provide effective, safe health care. Lastly, @ePatientDave tells the story of Dr. Eric Topol utilizing a mobile health tool, AliveCor, to diagnose a woman on his flight home from HIMSS and the impact of mhealth tools.

When Patients Engage, Outcomes are Better

Read the rest of this post »

Top 5 Technology Trends in Healthcare – December 2012

The healthcare IT field is rapidly developing and changing. Emerging technology and updated regulations put pressure on healthcare providers and health plans to stay ahead of the curve. Perficient creates a monthly list that explores some of the current topics and issues in health IT. This list examines the most talked about issues and technologies that are currently affecting the industry.

HCBlog Top5

 Portals

Having social networking access to providers, via secure portals, patients have the ability to be more engaged in their care and make better decisions about the care they receive. Portals provide near instantaneous access to patient and clinical information, streamline core business processes, referrals and claims, and improve communications with patients/members, physicians, administrators and partners. Meaningful Use Stage 2 requirements are helping to spur the growth of portals.

Hospital Readmissions

Hospital readmission is a growing problem within our health system.  Many patients discharged from an inpatient stay find themselves back in the hospital within 30 days. Some of these readmissions are considered avoidable and as signs of poor care and coordination. Predictive analytics are able to help healthcare organizations manage clinical issues in a timely manner and analyze statistical data to identify potentially preventable conditions. Healthcare business intelligence can provide organizations the ability to use their data to improve quality of care, increase financial efficiency and operational effectiveness, conduct innovative research and satisfy regulatory requirements

Read the rest of this post »

Top 5 Technology Trends in Healthcare – October 2012

The healthcare IT field is rapidly developing and changing. Emerging technology and updated regulations put pressure on healthcare providers and health plans to stay ahead of the curve. Perficient creates a monthly list that explores some of the current topics and issues in health IT. This list examines the most talked about issues and technologies that are currently affecting the industry.

 

EHR/Meaningful Use Stage 2

Meaningful Use is a set of standards that ensures Electronic Health Record systems are being used meaningfully, in order to improve the quality of care. Stage 2 of meaningful use has a primary theme of interoperability between EHR systems and engaging patients in their own care.

Health BI/Big Data

Healthcare business intelligence can provide organizations the ability to use their data to improve quality of care, increase financial efficiency and operational effectiveness, conduct innovative research and satisfy regulatory requirements. Analytics can provide the critical insights in meeting the organizations’ goals and gain competitive advantage.

Read the rest of this post »

Oracle Open World 2012: The Healthcare Edition

This week Perficient Healthcare will be heading to Oracle Open World in San Francisco.  If you’re in town for the event, then please feel free to stop by to geek out with the Perficient crew on the latest in Health IT.  What will we be talking about?

Accountable Care = HIE + Analytics

In order for healthcare organizations to comply with evolving governance and compliance regulations, and combine and exchange clinical and cost information through a comprehensive delivery model, Health Information Exchange (HIE) must be a part of the overall conversation for population health in Accountable Care.  Healthcare organizations can further accelerate compliance to ACO quality reporting requirements by using Business Intelligence and Analytics tools to enhance clinical decision support, performance bench marketing, and persona based dashboards that unlock the medical value of electronic information.  Not only have we seen some great Oracle HIE tools, in the form of Oracle Health Information Exchange, we all know that robust analytics are an imperative toward harnessing the big data that is population health.

Connected Health

I’ll specifically be speaking on the topic of Connected Health and the ePatient at the event.  I’ll be discussing the correct technology decisions a healthcare organization needs to make to harness the growing movement of ePatients in Healthcare Consumerism.  Key points include:

  • Provide instant access to patient and clinical information through Healthcare Portals
  • Enable instantaneous access to patient and clinical information using Mobile Health applications
  • Transmit medical images, video and audio for Telehealth diagnosis and treatment plans
  • Allow patients to exchange information and discuss health conditions with healthcare providers using Social Media

Look forward to seeing you at the event!