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Posts Tagged ‘analytics’

Moving Toward Innovative Cost Transformation

Leverage Clinical and Financial Data to Improve Patient Outcomes

If you read the trade journals for hospitals and health systems, you are reading about cost transformation and cost management. That said, I think this really means different things to different people. In fact, I hear people say “cost” often when in fact they mean “expense”. This minor exchange of words really changes the subject. Today, I want to talk about moving toward cost vs. quality and how it will require two worlds to collide.

I wrote a blog a few months ago about taking a quality approach to ICD10 conversions and to some degree the same discipline will be required to bridge operational and clinical functions – including collaboration from the CFO, finance staff, CMO (Chief Medical Officer), CNO (Chief Nursing Officer) and division/department administrators – to consider quality, safety, patient satisfaction, and financial performance simultaneously. In some organizations, there may be a need to significantly and fundamentally rethink operations and what services and businesses are core to their mission.   New productivity measures may emerge and new and different uses of technology may emerge. I think this is a fundamental culture shift which will require collaboration and significant leadership to see it through to completion. This, along with EMR adoption is rightly transforming healthcare and I’m not even talking about “BIG” data yet.

This culture shift should include an evolved IT staff as well. Priorities must be set for integrating and storing data to support these initiatives. The volume of data needed to extract and evaluate EMR patient-level data on a daily basis is not something for Excel. While data visualizations can take many forms, the data analysis for quality and cost has to be repeatable, sharable and trustworthy.

We are already seeing a trend of hospital CFO retirements … and I think there will be more. Tell me what you think?

If you are attending the Oracle Healthcare User Group @HIUG_Interact 2015, taking place in Las Vegas June 7-10, stop by booth #118, meet our dynamic team and discuss new ways to optimize your analytics!

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Pre-Packaged Analytics Applications Measure What Matters

Pre-Packaged Analytics Applications Measure What Matters

My years of working with transactional systems helps me really appreciate the age old question of “how to get data out?” My curiosity about using data to gain actionable business insights started with the first computer program I ever developed. It was a natural progression of my problem-solving skills. I was involved with building transformational financial reporting applications to complement the then state of the art mainframe ERP applications in play at Continental Airlines. Time would prove this approach as not sustainable so I was very excited for the next phase of “pre-packaged analytics applications” such as Seibel Analytics and Essbase integration with Lawson ERP (both were “the best thing since sliced bread”).

Like most technology, these pre-packaged analytics applications have improved over time so I truly believe that BI managers should consider implementing them. These apps are prebuilt and aligned with functional and vertical business domains that are built on a pre-integrated, scalable data warehousing infrastructure. They are geared to organizations that want to accelerate the time it takes to deploy BI solutions and deliver an analytical complement to their packaged operational applications.

A packaged analytics application integrates all the components required to deliver a BI solution:

  • Connectors to various packaged operational systems (i.e. CRM, ERP, Sales, EMR)
  • An extendable and flexible enterprise data model
  • Extract, transform and load (ETL) tools
  • A BI semantic layer
  • Query and reporting tools, including ad hoc capability
  • Predefined metrics, reports and dashboards … sometimes hundreds of them.

Vendors of packaged solutions integrate these components using industry best practices and techniques. This is key because they also provide upgrades as the transactional data is improved and it means that customers get a best-in-class BI solution in weeks compared to months if they were to build a solution from scratch. The best analytics packages all run off the same enterprise model and platform so that healthcare organizations can start with one functional application and extend it with a comprehensive, integrated, enterprise BI solution one application at a time.

Pre-packaged solutions are readily available and should be considered as value add when making an evaluation of ERP and EMR applications. The two big EMR powerhouses are both providing some level of pre-packaged reporting solutions. The vendors know their data models and these pre-built solutions are the fastest way to measure what matters when it comes to common business transactions.

Pre-packaged applications play a vital role of aggregating data for a set of business processes, but if an enterprise expects to get true value of their data, the need for an “Enterprise” data warehouse still exists. This is why I am so passionate about these solutions … the chance to find new and actionable insights from data is the ultimate goal of analytics. We can’t find out the value without “mashing up” data across silos. For example: how to understand revenue to expense ratios or productivity metrics such as FTEs per unit sold, hours worked per billable test or how to correlate unstructured data such as social media data with structured data when evaluating a patient in a clinical trial.

Perficient implements both pre-packaged analytics and data warehouse technology across multiple platforms. The Oracle Enterprise Healthcare Analytics (EHA) platform is uniquely adaptable to breaking down the silos in healthcare though an integrated model that expands across finance, clinical and research domains.

If you are attending the Oracle Healthcare User Group @HIUG_Interact 2015, taking place in Las Vegas June 7-10, stop by booth #118, meet our dynamic team and discuss new ways to optimize your analytics!

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Talking SMAC: 4 Actions Healthcare CIOs Need to Take

Talking SMAC: 4 Actions Healthcare CIOs Need to Take

The healthcare industry tends to lag behind other industries when it comes to many things, especially the adoption and implementation of new technologies. There are several factors that contribute to this hesitancy, like the need to adhere to strict privacy and security regulations, new initiatives brought on by healthcare reform and consolidation within the industry. As technology continues to evolve, healthcare CIOs need to be able to identify and invest in technologies that will support key industry needs. CIOs should be looking for ways to leverage social, mobile, analytics and cloud (SMAC) solutions as they go through their software selection processes.

Here are 4 of the key actions necessary to leverage the power of SMAC:

Prepare for a hybrid IT environment
Healthcare organizations are facing several industry challenges and are feeling the pressure to transform their organizations in order to adapt to the evolving industry. The pressure to reduce costs, develop population health management capabilities and a shift to value-based reimbursement and payment models are requiring healthcare organizations to look beyond traditional solutions. In many cases CIOs are turning to a hybrid IT environment and leveraging external service providers within their solution architectures. A hybrid IT ecosystem means less and less in house, and puts added pressure on IT leadership because they are still responsible for governance, security and service of the IT systems.

Get in front of interoperability
Interoperability has become front-and-center in healthcare, integration of systems and data from multiple sources is critical to meeting the demands of the transforming healthcare industry. Interoperability is essential to leveraging social, mobile, analytics and cloud (SMAC) capabilities. Healthcare CIOs need to establish a strong interoperability foundation in order to take advantage of SMAC. Robust integration and health information exchange (HIE) are required to meet the demands of the transforming healthcare industry and integration of SMAC must be part of the interoperability roadmap.

Leverage social media to engage consumers and patients and promote your patient portal
When it comes to patient portals, many healthcare CIOs are focused on meeting the requirements of Meaningful Use, rather than creating an engaging portal. Healthcare organizations need to look beyond Meaningful Use and create a patient portal that engages and empowers their patients. CIOs need to include market-driven patient portal features like: dynamic scheduling, gamification and telehealth to meet the demands of the market. Learn more about the 7 Features of a Market-Driven Patient Portal here.

Simplify your architecture
We have all heard many times that less is more and this is good advice to follow when it comes to healthcare IT. Oftentimes, healthcare organizations have the opportunity to make room for innovation by retiring their legacy systems and applications. CIOs need to prioritize their legacy systems based on several factors including but not limited to: costs of maintenance and support, complexity and compliance. Industry consolidation has added to the complexity and increased the number of systems within healthcare organizations. Simplifying the architecture can be challenging but the improved patient care, efficiencies gained and overall results make it well worth it.

The transforming healthcare industry is putting additional strain on healthcare executives to provide high-quality care at an affordable cost. Utilizing technology to improve operational performance and enhance patient care is critical to the success of healthcare organizations. Digital transformation in healthcare is happening as we speak. Healthcare consumers are demanding transparency and convenience  – what better way to connect and empower consumers than through the use of SMAC (social, mobile, analytics, cloud).

Transform Unstructured Healthcare Data Into Key Patient Insights

The transformation of the healthcare industry from a fee for service model to a value-based care model will only succeed if healthcare providers are able to generate a complete, 360 degree view of the patient. In a Transform Unstructured Healthcare Data Into Key Patient Insightsrecent blog Stephanie Banks, Senior Marketing Manager at Perficient, talks about how the importance of leveraging technology to uncover value in healthcare data:

Healthcare companies in the digital age are now responsible for vast amounts of data. This data is created and acquired on a daily basis, and the volumes are increasing substantially with each patient visit or interaction.  Some information is stored in pre-determined, structured fields within Electronic Medical Records (EMR), claims or financial systems and is readily accessible with traditional analytics.  Other information, such as doctor’s notes, patient surveys, call center recordings and diagnosis reports is saved in a free-form, textual format and is rarely used for analytics due to the limitations of traditional business intelligence solutions.

Experts suggest that up to 80% of enterprise data exists in an unstructured format, which means a large majority of critical data isn’t being considered or analyzed. Without accounting for this significant percentage of available information, healthcare organizations will find it challenging to make accurate and well-informed decisions that impact patient care and organizational operations.

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Why business intelligence isn’t the end game for health analytics

A few years ago, I transplanted my family from the south to Washington DC.  I love the Capital, for its history, its influence, but we quickly realized we had left Mayberry and arrived on Jupiter.  Horns honked and people moved around briskly.  Maybe it was us – our naiveté — or maybe it was the community we had arrived in.  But we quickly realized: “If you order french fries, you get french fries.” And only french fries. Months of dining out were spent, only to find that our presumed “condiments” were not standard with our order.  We would have to ask for them and specify the quantity.  French Fries and 2 ketchups, please.

Careful.Well I clicked my heels three times and eventually moved us back to our Mayberry.  It’s been three years and my son and I will still giggle together when we order french fries and see someone going out of his or her way to offer ketchup.  And when we say “Yes, Please”, we get several packets.

Consulting in Healthcare is no different. We’ve grown accustomed to the “build to spec” approach.  You get exactly what you asked for.

I’m thankful to be a part of Perficient and the Oracle Healthcare Business Intelligence team.  We share a common philosophy – understand what the customer wants to achieve, coach and advise available options, design and deliver a solution that fulfills their NOW problem and simultaneously prepared them for the next 5 years.  It’s not just a report – it’s Healthcare Analytics. Read the rest of this post »

Can you predict my future? Predictive analytics at #HIMSS14

While my interest is always in the convergence of technology like the Internet of Things and healthcare IT, the role of sensors in managing health and wellness is just exploding. 

“The most popular device functionality in the wearable tech market is heart rate monitoring, with nearly 12 million such devices shipped in 2013. Pedometers and activity trackers accounted for a combined 16 million shipments over the same period.” (According to a report released Thursday by ABI Research)

– Source: New report shows smartwatches and AR glasses have their work cut out.

the role of analytics, especially healthcare analytics, should be to inform, encourage and drive healthcare consumers to improve our behaviors or decisions without being intrusive.

“The role of analytics, especially healthcare analytics, should be to inform, encourage and drive healthcare consumers to improve our behaviors or decisions without being intrusive.”

You can’t turn anywhere without reading about the latest running gadgets, fitness bands, Bluetooth blood pressure cuffs, etc.  In the inevitable rush to wearable computing, one key idea can get lost: what are we doing with all of that data? 

The data produced by these devices and sensors has to be interpreted and turned into information that is actionable.  The fitness band that looks at your goal of 10,000 steps, sees that you are at 8,000 steps right after dinner and encourages you for one final walk around the neighborhood, will ultimately win out over all others.  In order to pull off that trick, we need analytics and, sometimes, predictive analytics.

Just as the sensors are working in the background without us even taking notice, the role of analytics, especially healthcare analytics, should be to inform, encourage and drive healthcare consumers to improve our behaviors or decisions without being intrusive.  The goal of healthcare analytics or informatics should be to create an environment for the healthcare consumer that makes life better, easier and more enjoyable.

An example is when the running app sees your pace slowing down towards the end of a run, then it kicks in a song with a faster pace to help you finish strong.  Today those apps require you to recognize that situation and take action of pressing a button.  It’s all there but it’s not automated.  What we need is that invisible intelligence that recognizes the situation and then takes action to assist us.

The Role of AnalyticsAt HIMSS 2014, we will be seeing this jump in interest in predictive analytics as it applies to healthcare, especially two distinct types of predictive analytics.

  1. One type is the traditional forecasting model of advanced analytics that trends past information to predict future states.
  2. The second type of predictive analytics is statistical models that encompass multiple feeds or variables to predict a future outcome.  This modeling is rapidly moving past the arena of data scientists who create the models and is moving more within the grasp of smart business analysts.  These models can predict your longevity based on multiple factors like your BMI, blood sugar readings for diabetics and other factors from your medical history.

Of course, we want to be able to predict health outcomes, especially when faced with several choices for changing our behaviors or lifestyle.  It will be exciting to see how healthcare application vendors are addressing this important next step in analytics.

The use of predictive analytics could really change the nature of a patient engagement with your doctor.  How will we react when we see the outcome of our current lifestyle?  Will we shut off Netflix bingeing and head to the gym? See you at HIMSS 2014 to find out!  Stop by Perficient’s booth #2035 and tell us what you found out!



Reframing the ACO Analytics Problem with Malcolm Gladwell

I just finished watching a quick slideshow on the Health Data Management website, “Enterprise Analytics: Moving on Up” and as luck would have it, I also watched several sessions of the live Webcast from the Healthcare Innovation Day Conference 2014 in Washington, DC, sponsored by West Health Institute and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC).

Malcolm Gladwell quoteWhile I was watching these, I was intrigued by the thought of how Accountable Care Organizations (ACO) can leverage existing solutions, combined with point solutions, to accomplish their reporting, analytics and beyond, and use interoperability wisely.  One of the key learning points for me from these sessions was this:  “Reframe the problem”….advice from Malcolm Gladwell’s keynote address.

How do we “reframe the problem” when it comes to ACO reporting and analytics?  There are defined metrics that are required for these organizations, so how can we leverage existing systems to create these reports and analytics?  Do we “build vs. buy”?  Depending upon the organizational size, legacy systems and IT support, the decision can be difficult.  What is good for one system may not work in another.  So where do we start?

A strategic evaluation of current state and desired future state with the development of a road map may be a logical first step.  Data Governance also needs to happen early on in the process to allow an organization to create data standards that will drive reporting and analytics.  Once these steps have occurred, an organization can feel confident that they can make an informed decision to “build or buy.”

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Database inferencing to get to trusted healthcare data

A health insurance client of mine recently embarked on an initiative to truly have “trusted data” in its Enterprise Data Warehouse so that business leaders could make decisions based on accurate data.  However, how can one truly know if your data is trustable??   In addition to having solid controls in place (e.g., unique indexes on the primary AND natural key), it is also necessary to measure how the data compares to defined quality rulesWithout this measurement, trusted data is a hope – not an assured reality. 

shutterstock_71078161To enable this measurement, I designed a repository for storing

  • configurable data quality rules,
  • metadata about data structures to be measured,
  • and the results of data quality measurements.

I experienced the need to be able to perform a degree of “inferencing” in the relational database (DB2) being used for this repository.  Normally one thinks of inferencing as the domain of semantic modeling and semantic web technologies like RDF, OWL, SPARQL, Pellet, etc. – and these are indeed very powerful technologies that I have written about elsewhere.  However, using semantic web technologies wasn’t a possibility for this system.

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5 Reasons Big Data Improves Personalization of Medicine

I enjoyed an article today in IT Business Edge about the ways that Big Data is improving outcomes. We hear that all the time, right? But what does it really mean? Why does more (and better) patient data lead to improved healthcare for all? When business intelligence is leveraged properly to deliver insights to healthcare providers, we see the following:

  1. 5_waysLearning what we never knew before: 

    “Allowing for previously unknown factors involved in disease to be discovered and utilized as drug targets or disease biomarkers.”

  2. Comparing data points from various sources to individualize treatment plans, improving outcomes. 

    “We are able to align and compare multiple data points from various sources, tailoring individualized treatment plans for each patient.”

  3. A move from subjective interpretation to objective diagnosis.A coworker of mine said to me yesterday, “Can you imagine when our kids are older? They’ll be laughing at our stories of how doctors once said to us, ‘Based on your symptoms, I think you have [X disease].'”

    She’s right. Diagnoses vary from physician to physician based on his or her background and experience. Not any more! As this article states, we’re facing a “datafication” of patient samples.

    “A vast quantity of knowledge that can be statistically analyzed and quickly reviewed by multiple clinicians for solid diagnosis”

  4. Better – and faster – decisions about treatment as a result of more and better patient data
    “Clinicians can systematically extract more information from each patient without requiring multiple rounds of testing.”
  5.  More accurate diagnosis and more appropriate spending on treatments due to reproducible testing”Consistently reproducible test results are possible between clinicians and doctors for more accurate diagnosis and appropriate spending on therapy options.”

Identity and the Internet of Things – Lessons for Healthcare

Attending Dreamforce in San Francisco last month, I was reminded of an article I read in All Things Digital about the role of Identity and the Internet of Things.  Apparently Marc Benioff,’s CEO, mentioned during a presentation at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch 2013 Technology Conference,  that Phillips, the electronics company long known for staple consumer products like TVs, cameras and audio equipment, was working on a new toothbrush. The toothbrush under development was not just any ordinary toothbrush but included GPS, Wi-Fi and “realtime” feedback on how a person brushes their teeth.  Voila, no more lying to your dentist – self-quantification will rat you out with your own data.

While the concept of “The Internet of Things” like the high-tech toothbrush isn’t new,’s forward thinking CEO was previewing a new trend — connected devices are becoming inextricably tied to identity.  Just like my registration email at Dreamforce using a barcode to speed check-in and attendance at sessions.  My identity Internet-Of-Thingswas tied to a “thing” in the Internet of Things.  Lots of my personal devices are internet-enabled as well, connecting my identity to how far I walk for exercise, where I travel, what hotels I stay at, etc.  In the world of social, devices like the smartphone, activity tracking wristbands, etc. are creating comprehensive profiles of our “real” behaviors like brushing our teeth.

It doesn’t take a big leap to understand the impact of connecting my identity and devices on managing my health or lifestyle.  You can easily imagine a healthcare plan, like Geico does on cars, offering a discounted health plan in exchange for your comprehensive lifestyle profile, or at least lower deductibles for positive behaviors, including taking your medications on time.  The challenge will be making certain that your identity is truly linked to your proper information in healthcare systems and there are clear safeguards in place.  As the article in All Things Digital states

“And to be clear, trust-based relationships with users means that privacy must be accounted for and the right controls must be in place before businesses start collecting and using this data. With the proper opt-in/out privacy controls in place, identity-defining traits like hometown, religious beliefs, relationships status, likes, activities and social graph can be available to marketers and used to drive hyper-relevant marketing campaigns.”

As the list of connected “things” in our lives grows and uses our identity to tie our behavior profile to our healthcare management, the pressure will be increased for outstanding master data management by healthcare providers and healthcare plans.  It is amazingly difficult for healthcare companies to conquer enterprise-level master patient indexes to resolve your one identity and create a combined view of your medical history.  While your smartphone revolves around your Facebook username and password, Twitter log-ins, etc. to know you, the fragmented healthcare system must piece together that you go by your middle name, use a nickname or don’t really know your actual Social Security Number.

Master Data Management and Identity Management for healthcare is literally a matter of life and death, especially for people with medication allergies, chronic conditions like diabetes and people with medical implants like pacemakers.  Dick Chaney took the extreme step of firewalling his wireless connection on his pacemaker, for example, to block terrorists from attacking him based on his device and identity.  While we enjoy the idea of our exercise wrist band taking to our smart thermostat to cool down the house after a run, we need to understand the broader implication of this degree of connectivity into our own safety as patients.

You may laugh the next time that the hospital asks you your name for the umpteenth time or marks the site of your surgery with a marker, but identity matters in healthcare and as that industry becomes more connected like your devices, make sure that your information is correct, up to date and is “real.”  It could literally save your life.

Are you really listening to your patients?

If the pressure to obtain and implement Customer Relationship Management software by healthcare organizations is any indication, decision makers are recognizing the increasing importance of consumer knowledge in the race to improve patient satisfaction scores.  Indeed, today, patient insights can lead healthcare organizations to their best opportunities for growth and restoration of profitability far more accurately than that marketing presentation in the boardroom.  The increasingly reluctant spending by healthcare consumers needs to be better understood because a healthy healthcare delivery system depends on it.  The challenge is that healthcare consumer interactions are not typically structured information that is easily analyzed to be acted upon, but are increasingly emails, phone conversations, web-based chat support and other unstructured information.

Increasingly, outbound direct mail or telemarketing is simply not getting results for healthcare marketing departments.  The focus needs to shift to creating a great consumer experience on the inbound approach as an alternative. Doesn’t everyone enjoy doing business with a company that is easy to find and obtain what you are looking iStock_DoctorPatientfor?  You don’t have to look far for proof of this idea.  No longer able to differentiate on brand reputation, leading companies instead are focusing on the consumer experience—the all-important feelings that consumers develop about a company and its products or services across all touch points—as the key opportunity to break from their competition and regain lost revenue from programs like hospital value based purchasing. Outside of healthcare, the evidence of this new emphasis is found in the emergence of the “chief consumer officer” (CCO) role across the Fortune 1000 community.  Companies such as United Airlines, Samsung and Chrysler have all implemented chief consumer officers as part of their executive suites.  Should healthcare plans and providers consider this key competitive move too?

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Top 5 Technology Trends in Healthcare – September 2013

The healthcare IT field is rapidly developing and changing. Emerging technology and updated regulations put pressure on healthcare providers and health plans to stay ahead of the curve. Perficient creates a monthly list that explores some of the current topics and issues in health IT. This list examines the most talked about issues and technologies that are currently affecting the industry.

HCBlog Top5 Trends

Obamacare Defunding

Under the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, over 48 million uninsured Americans will be eligible for enrollment in subsidized plans through state-run health insurance exchanges, with annually increasing fines for those who go uncovered. Currently, the US government is reviewing calls to defund Obamacare while Health Insurance Exchanges are set to open on October 1st.

Google Calico

Last week, Google announced it would be reentering the e-health game with its new product, Calico. The goal of Calico is to positively impact aging and associated diseases, while focusing on health and well-being. Initially, Calico will fun aging and preventable disease research projects.

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