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Archive for the ‘Health Information Exchange’ Category

Includes Enterprise HIE and State-Wide HIE

ACA and QRS – Shoot for the Stars Part 3

In ACA and QRS – Shoot for the Stars Part 1, I laid out the overall domains that are going to be used to score QHP plans offered through the Marketplace. In Part 2, I discussed some factors to consider for the data derived measures. In this blog, we will take a closer look at the survey derived measures and what factors a QHP issuer should consider to achieve high scores.

surveyAgain, for reference all 43 of the required measures can be found on the CMS website (click here).

Now let’s take a look at some factors to keep in mind when dealing with the Enrollee Satisfaction Survey (ESS) derived measures:

Leverage CAHPS Processes
As mentioned in Part 2, it was required to get Health Plans Accredited to offer on-market. In addition, CMS aligned required QRS ESS measures with current CAHPS measures that are typically required during accreditation. And just as an organization should leverage HEDIS for data, make sure to leverage current investments in CAHPS to keep initial costs low while jump starting ESS efforts.
Read the rest of this post »

3 Questions Apple Must Answer to Reduce HealthKit Skepticism

There has been a lot of buzz around Apple’s announcement to enter the healthcare space with the unveiling of their Apple Watch and HealthKit app. HealthKit seems to be gaining momentum due in large part to Apple’s strategic partnerships with healthcare industry heavy-hitters. However, many questions remain 3 Questions Apple Must Answer to Reduce Skepticismunanswered and Apple must address them to gain buy-in from skeptics.

PRIVACY: How will patient information be kept private?
Having all patient information in one place seems like a necessary step to improve quality of care. A centralized location means the right person can have access to the right information at the right time. However, people are concerned about having all their private information in one location is too risky and makes them susceptible to hackers. Recently, Apple addressed privacy concerns by updating their privacy policy and their guidelines for app developers. Apps working with HealthKit, may not use the personal data gathered for advertising or data-mining uses other than for helping manage an individual’s health and fitness, or for medical research. Apple is also considering a “HealthKit Certification” for developers to help address the privacy concerns.

SECURITY: How will patient information be protected?
For years, there have been very little security concerns surrounding Apple, however, concerns over Apple’s security have risen recently after an alleged hack on iCloud led to several risque celebrity photos being published. According to cloud security vendor Skyhigh Networks, over 90% of cloud services used in healthcare pose medium to high security risk. Apple has promised to tighten up security on the iCloud to protect patient information. Healthcare consumers must regain confidence in Apple’s ability to keep their information secure and safe from hackers.

REAL-WORLD USE: How does the HealthKit work?
Lets face it, people are busy, Healthcare professionals are overloaded, and focused first and foremost on providing quality care to their patients. They do not have time to play with an iPhone app, needless to say,  HealthKit data must be streamlined. It must be convenient, provide accurate and timely information and integrate seamlessly into a patient’s electronic medical records. Simply put people aren’t just going to use HealthKit because it is an Apple app, they aren’t going to use it because it is a fad (at least not long-term), they will use it because it is convenient and can improve patient outcomes.

Apple continues to build on their partnerships with major players in the healthcare industry. They are preparing to launch trials with two prominent hospitals in the United States. The trials will focus on a group of people with diabetes and chronic diseases and will offer a glimpse on how the HealthKit will work. The HealthKit app will receive information from regulated medical devices such as glucose monitors and blood pressure meters.

Standford University Hospital is working with Apple to track blood sugar levels in children with diabetes and Duke University is helping to develop a pilot program to track blood pressure, weight and other measurements for patients with heart disease and cancer. The goal with both of these trials is to improve speed and accuracy of data reported. If these pilot programs run smoothly you can expect to see them rapidly expand to other hospitals.

It is still too early to tell what impact Apple will have on the healthcare industry, but they are certainly putting the right pieces together. More work needs to be done to address privacy and security concerns and gain trust from the healthcare community.  Their partnerships with hospitals, medical information services and medical device makers may be the perfect storm,  but the success of HealthKit will depend on those that actually “use” it.

ACA and QRS – Shoot for the Stars Part 2

In ACA and QRS – Shoot for the Stars Part 1, I laid out the overall domains that are going to be used to score QHP plans offered through the Marketplace. In this blog, we will take a closer look at the data derived measures and what factors a QHP issuer should consider to achieve high scores.

HC DataFor reference all 43 of the required measures can be found on the CMS website (click here).

Now let’s take a look at some factors to keep in mind when dealing with the data derived measures:

Leverage Accreditation Processes

It was required to get Health Plans Accredited to offer on-market. In addition, CMS aligned required QRS data measures with HEDIS measures that are typically required during accreditation. So, make sure to leverage current investments to keep initial costs low while jump starting QRS efforts.
Read the rest of this post »

Market Driven Patient Portal: HIE Across Diverse Care Settings

So far in this discussion about “What the market says you need in your patient portal” we have been driving toward changes that are core to new engagement models. However, we have not addressed a core enabler: “It’s all about the data!”

Consumers demand access to information that meets their needs and they are not complacent Market Driven Patient Portal: Health Information Exchange Across Diverse Care Settingswith becoming hunters and gatherers for the information is truly about them. Consumers in today’s market demand accurate and up-to-date information about their health profile, just like they do with respect to their financial profile. However, the systems and processes to make that information available are not all there.

There are various sources of the information that are relevant to the patients/consumers (and also to the providers providing care to their patients). Much of this data has been distributed through the provider community. Some of the data is in the provider’s own systems. Some of the data is in the hospitals EHR systems. Some of the data is in outpatient facility systems. Other data is isolated and hard to locate.

With the push to HIEs some of the data is now becoming more available to the providers and to the patients they serve. However integrating the data into a holistic view is still a challenge. The information still needs to be gathered / extracted from the source systems, transformed into a structure that the HIE can understand and then there are the issues of translating the codes and values to normalized/consistent terms following a defined set of vocabularies. Additionally, ensuring a unified view of the individual can be a challenge. Enterprises IT groups are leveraging Enterprise Master Person Index (EMPI) solutions to construct the golden record of the individual but this also has its challenges.

Once all of the data is assembled (assuming that it is) the next challenge is to get the information to the right person at the right time. The HIE now needs to be integrated to the rest of the enterprise. Exposing the information in terms of the services or APIs can now begin. Finally the Portal (and this is just one of the consumers) can begin to consume these services and make the information available to the consumers. What’s also of importance is that the consumers can access this data from multiple perspectives. The provider can see full episodes of care across multiple care locations. The patient can see their health profile all in one location.

Having a single view of one’s health profile (or even the illusion of) is a powerful tool. Not only does it provide insights for better care, it breaks down the walls of information silos that have challenged providers and patient’s alike. Again, it is all about the data, and integration and interoperability are the key.

ACA and QRS – Shoot for the stars! Part 1

Last month I posted “ACA’s Quality Rating System – An opportunity to gain market share”, which explained how QHP issuers can gain market share in the individual space.  In that blog I mentioned that, as part of the Quality Rating System, plans offered on the Marketplace will receive a “Star” rating based on a 5 star rating system. Over the next few Shoot for the stars!posts, I would like to take a look at what this means from a health plan’s perspective.
As background, there are 43 measures that will need to be tracked. Out of the 43 measures, 31 are derived from data and 12 are derived from the survey. In addition, the draft QRS scoring specifications published by CMS organizes the 43 required measures into composites that roll up into eight domains. These domains are as follows:

  • Clinical Effectiveness
  • Patient Safety
  • Care Coordination
  • Prevention
  • Access
  • Doctor and Care
  • Efficiency and Affordability
  • Plan Services

The eight domains are then rolled up in to three summary indicators: 1) Clinical Quality Management; 2) Member Experience; and 3) Plan Efficiency, Affordability and Management. And of course, the final result is a star rating.

Read the rest of this post »

Apple HealthKit: A Game Changer

I have been an athlete all my life, but since I’ve reached my 30’s, had 5 reconstructive surgeries, and moved back to the Midwest to a completely sedentary job, staying fit and healthy has become more challenging than ever before.

As an Apple lover for years, I have a myriad of Apps I enlisted to help. Between TargetWEIGHT, MYFitnesspal, MapMyFitness, myWOD, and Nike Fit Band, I have been unsuccessful in maintaining the health and fitness level of my satisfaction.Apple HealthKit: A Game Changer

When I heard about the Apple HealthKit platform and the ability for it to sync with third party application data, the question I posed to myself was, will this help me? I have no chronic illness. I’m not sick. I just want to be healthy. After doing some primitive research, if Apple can pull this off as they say they can, it will revolutionize not just my health technology experience, but the way any doctor in my future will diagnose and treat me.

The Apple HealthKit in addition to the Myhealth App promises to connect Apple Applications & other devices to one another, and to your physician if you choose to. Alleged, my myriad of applications will update one another automatically so I can work (at my nutrition & fitness) smarter and more accurately. Or, if I choose to use the Myhealth, this data will aggregate within the application in a single profile to use and share. Myhealth has 47 different tracking options to help me reach my goals, along with tracking my health milestones and medications/allergies. Furthermore, in case of an emergency, this historical account of my vitals, fitness level, and health milestones such as a chronic illness diagnosis are logged and can be shared with the ER Doctor. This may be critical in saving my life.

I am very conscious however that many folks are extremely uncomfortable with having this type of data in the cloud. I believe this will be a large barrier for Apple along with other 3rd party development partners to overcome. However the technology to keep this information secure exists, and I believe it can be done right. The challenge for Apple is to relay to the public the capabilities of internet security. Now educating Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Y’ers on Cloud Security and gaining the trust to make this Application helpful to all generations may be a challenge and will come with time.

Luckily, as a thirty-something that needs to keep track of my own family’s health along with my aging parent’s health, having health information at my fingertips may not just be convenient but literally may be a life saver. The Mayo Clinic thinks so, they have partnered with Apple along with Epic to make this endeavor successful. You can read more at:

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2014/06/apple-partnership-epic-game-changer/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+iMedicalApps+%28iMedicalApps%29

It’s IaaS not IaaS – Creating a nimble Healthcare organization

I always find industry acronyms amusing. Sometimes they describe new technologies, other times they are a new name for an existing technology (maybe with a slight twist).  And then there are those times when two different technologies, models, theories, etc. end upwith the same acronym. Such is the case with Information as a Service and Infrastructure as a Service. Both are interesting concepts that deserve equal time, but today I would like to talk about Information as a Service (IaaS).

IaaS PicIaaS is certainly not a new concept. It has been around for a while. But it does merit a re-visit every now and then, since many healthcare organizations still struggle with integrating multiple systems and data sources.

At the core of IaaS is the concept of developing a common data model (also known as a canonical model) using schematic mapping and master data management. The common data model that is exposed represents multiple autonomous information sources that organizations use in order to transact business on a daily basis. Read the rest of this post »

ACA’s Quality Rating System – An opportunity to gain market share

Starting in 2015 all issuers of Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) on the Healthcare Marketplace will need to provide Quality Rating System (QRS) measurements that will be aggregated and scored to provide consumers with a star rating for each product offered.

How many stars will you have?

How many stars will you have?

Although there are still details to be worked out by CMS, the required measures for the 2015 beta test are in place. All issuers that wish to continue providing QHPs on the Marketplace will need to provide the required measures. There are two different sets of measures included in the beta specifications.

The first is a set of clinical quality measurements that are mostly taken from the current NCQA HEDIS accreditation process. Many issuers already collect the data for these measures; especially, if they are meeting the requirement to be accredited for the Marketplace today and are using NCQA for that process.

The second is set of measures derived from an enrollee satisfaction survey (ESS) that needs to be performed by an accredited third party survey vendor. Most of the questions in the ESS are drawn from CAHPS. The survey processes requires that a sample of data is drawn, audited by a third party and provided to the survey vendor. The vendor then performs the survey and reports the results to CMS. Questions focus on rating an enrollee’s satisfaction with a plan over a six month period.

While the QRS initiative driven by the ACA attempts to provide transparency, it also creates a competitive market that will force issuers to look at ways to increase the quality of care and enrollee satisfaction to deliver better scores. The prize? For consumers, better products. For issuers, a larger share of the market.

Want to participate and win? Then you need a solution that not only provides the required measures, but also provides insight and the ability to drive quality improvements. This can be accomplished with a well thought out solution architecture that provides processes for delivering the measures and the means for analyzing data to drive improvements.

A Blueprint for Managing Drug Shortages

In April 2014, I read a startling article that the United States was importing salt water, saline, from Norway due to a shortage in the United States1. Bags of saline solution are one of the most common items used in modern healthcare and that is why it is amazing that American doctors have been facing a bizarre IV saline shortage that forces the import of heavily, unwieldy bags of salt water from overseas. As a result, hospitals, and especially cancer centers, have been keeping strict inventories of how many bags are on hand and struggling to avoid rationing their use. This turn of events led to a deeper look at the problems caused by drug shortages for healthcare organizations and developing a business intelligence blueprint to help manage shortages more effectively.

A Blueprint for Managing Drug Shortages

The IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics, in their report Drug Shortages: A closer look at products, suppliers and volume volatility, identified 6 key insights:

  1. The drug shortage problem is highly concentrated to generic injectables or five disease areas including oncology and cardiovascular diseases.
  2. The supply of drugs on the shortages list has been stable or increased overall in the past five years.
  3. There is significant volatility in the suppliers of the drugs, not the total volume supplied.
  4. The recent volatility is a new trend compared to previous years.
  5. The number of suppliers has fluctuated and may be one reason for the volatility.
  6. Some states are feeling the drug shortage more acutely than others.

Read the rest of this post »

Information Is Your Competitive Advantage

Information has always been available to us, but never before has there been so much at our finger tips, coming at us so quickly from many different sources. We can no longer continue managing our enterprise information the same way we have for the last 30 years, it is not sufficient. With that I would like to welcome you to the new generation of information management.Information is Your Competitive Advantage

Information is only useful to us if we can access it, understand it and can compare it to what we already know. Healthcare organizations rely on information to make smarter, faster and more impactful business decisions. Business leaders want access to many different kinds of information, but the problem is that information is often stored in separate, disconnected silos making it challenging to use the data strategically to generate business intelligence. Instead, often times, business leaders make decisions on intuition rather than hard data.

Enterprise data management solutions instantaneously capture data from enterprise systems, cloud devices and applications and help organizations standardize and deduplicate data. This helps organizations manage their information more effectively and minimizes conflicts and organizational data issues. Organizations need enterprise data management solutions to automatically track the performance and behavior of the data stored in their systems so they can make better business decisions.

Data alone is not useful, but data that can be turned into information is your competitive advantage. Enterprise information management (EIM) enables businesses to obtain more value from their data and content, unifying what has traditionally been a dichotomy. EIM turns unstructured and structured data into information, information that drives profitable business actions, and ultimately improves quality of care and business outcomes.

Industry expert and healthcare analytics strategist, Juliet Silver explains the importance of an EIM in a recent interview.

 

How Enterprise Mobility Management Can Improve Patient Care

Healthcare is an ever-changing industry, and healthcare organizations continue to face the challenge of improving the quality of care while remaining compliant with industry standards. Depending on the diagnosis, the patient journey can include transfers between acute, post-acute, ambulatory care and home-health care organizations. As a result of these often-frequent transitions in care settings, the patient’s quality of care and overall safety can be compromised.

How Enterprise Mobility Management Can Improve Patient CareEnterprise Mobility Management (EMM) allows healthcare organizations to securely and more efficiently exchange clinical data while remaining compliant with industry regulations such as HIPAA requirements. The use of mobile technologies and applications can help make this transition across the continuum of care smoother resulting in fewer hospital re-admissions and better patient outcomes.

By 2020, a projected 70 percent increase in home health aides signifies the importance of secure device management solutions outside of traditional care facilities. EMM provides organizations with the technology needed to positively impact patient care throughout the entire patient journey regardless of the treatment location.

 What will it take to get us there?

  1. IT administrators need to begin to focus on how they can extend existing standard health data processes to mobile devices.
  2. These mobile devices need to enable care providers to access and enter data into Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), manage prescriptions and patient financial data, among other data sources. This should all be able to happen in real time, from anywhere and is especially important for home health providers, so they can enter data from the patient’s home, on their mobile devices.
  3. Home health organizations need secure tablets and smartphones to ensure secure and protected medical record access. The need for mobility management and security are now more important than ever as the delivery of care continues to expand beyond the traditional clinical setting.

EMM will provide the security and medical record access needed to ensure quality of care and patient safety across the entire continuum of care.

 

10 Benefits of Enterprise Information Management in Healthcare

This month, we completed an interview with our healthcare analytics strategist, Juliette Silver. We wanted to understand how enterprise information management strategies can specifically optimize business performance, reduce costs, mitigate risks and improve quality of care.

From the interview, I take away at least 10 major benefits to establishing and leveraging an enterprise information management strategy in healthcare settings:

EIMAn EIM strategy can:

  1. Help manage access to enterprise information in a secure, HIPAA-compliant manner.
  2. Allow healthcare professionals to turn mountains of data into real-time decisions.
  3. Help focus people, process, policies, frameworks and foundational technologies toward how to best leverage enterprise data.
  4. Set forth the framework that will be used to provide the information delivery capability,whether the information is in the form of data (structured or unstructured) or unstructured content, or a combination of both.
  5. Help an organization respond to evolving regulatory requirements and reimbursement models.
  6. Define the information management model that will be used to harmonize the delivery of both content and data specific to a healthcare organization’s goals and objectives.
  7. Ensure the delivery of information in the form of a trustworthy source that can be interpreted, used and managed consistently across the enterprise.
  8. Give a clinician or healthcare knowledge worker the access they need to the many sources or types of information from which to make decisions.
  9. Ensure information is timely, accurate, valid, verified and generally fit for purpose.
  10. Produce a more holistic view of the patient, derived from structured data stored in an electronic health record and other clinical systems, as well as unstructured information or content made available in some of the forms previously stated.

Read the full interview here.