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Webinar: A Real Retail Strategy For Healthcare

Retailers understand customer loyalty and they understand the importance of predicting and A Real Retail Strategy for Healthcaremotivating customer behaviors.  With a continued focus on providing low-cost and high-quality care, the healthcare industry has been looking to the retail industry for ways to engage and empower consumers.

Healthcare has learned valuable lessons from retail, including how to use the retail setting as a medium for providing care and how to engage consumers outside of the care setting through the use of technology. Many times, what is neglected when assessing retail industry tactics is their core competency of using data insights to motivate and incentivize changes in consumer behavior. Retailers typically do a good job of using collaborative tools to engage consumers and gain valuable intel to improve customer experience.

Healthcare organizations are recognizing that understanding consumer data is at the heart of driving loyalty and improving consumer health and wellness decision-making. Establishing a single source of truth with consumer data enhances the consumer experience and generates insights to determine the next best in any multichannel experience.

Join Perficient for an educational webinar on Tuesday, March 31st. Our healthcare and retail experts will demonstrate how data can be leveraged to:

  • Transform passive recipients of care into active participants in care
  • Mass customize messaging aligned with population health initiatives
  • Achieve outreach objectives that convert unknown consumers into patients/members
  • Enhance care and lower healthcare costs
  • Achieve business objectives

Posted in News

Keeping A Personal Touch in #Digital Healthcare

Next time you are in a restaurant, coffee shop or on public transportation, take a look around at the number of people occupied by their smartphones and tablets instead of engaging with those right next to Keeping A Personal Touch in the Digital Healthcare Worldthem. As a society, we are becoming increasingly depersonalized and relying more on electronic communications and less on face to face interactions. Our dependence on technology and electronic communications is leading to a rapid decline of our interpersonal skills and some fear that healthcare providers will lose their personal touch as they continue to ramp up their technology use. How many times have you called an organization and all you wanted to do was talk to a human, but you spend several frustrating minutes on the phone listening to an automated voice.

In healthcare, the benefits of technology are tremendous, such as enhancing patient care and providing more accurate and timely analytics for improved outcomes. However, there is a rising concern that technology is replacing personal interactions, by minimizing the amount of time patients spend with providers and in turn dehumanizing healthcare. Amongst all the challenges healthcare providers are faced with, they must also find ways to keep a personal touch in the digital healthcare world. A patient-centered model starts with a Physician who listens to their patients.

Unfortunately the new healthcare system isn’t geared toward human interactions. Healthcare providers spend more time starring at a computer screen and checking boxes than communicating and more importantly listening to their patients. It reminds me of the scene in Patch Adams where the late and great, Robin Williams’ character is talking to a Doctor and he can clearly tell he isn’t listening so he starts rattling off ridiculous statements. Listening to patients and providing compassion and support can go a long way in keeping a personal touch in the digital world of healthcare. The use of technology will continue to rise but we must be sure to keep the CARE in healthcare.

 

The Perficient Health Analytics Gateway Wins IBM Beacon Award

Perficient’s Health Analytics Gateway is a robust solution that accelerates data integration by more than 50% and automates the population of the IBM Healthcare Data Model, which helps healthcare organizations generate  insightful and actionable analytics much quicker. This innovative solution delivers rapid results from the Enterprise Data Warehouse and provides business intelligence and analytics that can help manage readmissions, evaluate the cost of care, increase operational performance and improve population health management capabilities.

This Perficient Health Analytics Gateway:

  • Expands IBM Information Management tools
  • Reduces data integration time by more than 50%
  • Populates key functional areas meeting the needs of many top use cases
  • Provides standardized data for BI reporting

In recognition of the Health Analytics Gateway, Perficient recently received a 2015 IBM Beacon Award for Outstanding Information Management Solution. This top honor is awarded to a select few elite IBM Business Partners who have delivered exceptional solutions to drive business value and transform the way their clients and industries do business in the future. To learn more about Perficient’s Beacon Award visit the Perficient IBM blog.

UNC Health Care System recently leveraged the Health Analytics Gateway to accelerate data integration from their legacy systems and Epic by more than 50%. The Health Analytics Gateway also helped UNC Health Care System:

  • Eliminate dependency on older technologies
  • Integrate the platform to enable efficient data management
  • Complete integration between data from legacy systems and Epic
  • Develop a comprehensive data warehouse to support future analytics requirements

In addition to the Beacon Award recognition, Perficient was recently awarded the IBM Big Data & Analytics Worldwide Business Partner Excellence Award. We are excited to be recognized for our innovative solutions that are positively impacting healthcare organizations across the country.

The Health Information Exchange (HIE) Teeter-Totter

The cyber-attack on Anthem, the nation’s second-largest health insurer, directly reflects the vulnerability of healthcare organizations, which are years behind other industries in regards to protecting personal information. In today’s healthcare industry, the federal government encourages sharing information across the continuum, which is critical to improving patient care. The challenge is the balancing act between protecting personal information and making it useful – the health information exchange teeter-totter. Current federal privacy regulations and the industry standard call for encrypting information that is sent from the database; however, on-premise data commonly remains unencrypted, making it vulnerable to an attack.

The Healthcare Information Teeter-Totter

Anthem followed industry standards and encrypted the medical information that was shared outside of their database, but because they failed to secure their on-premise data, hackers gained access to up to 80 million records that include social security numbers, birthdays, addresses, email, employment information and income data for customers and employees. Scrambling personal data makes it less valuable to hackers, but also makes it more difficult for healthcare employees to track trends and share data with other healthcare providers and states.

Other industries such as the financial services industry keep personal information in separate databases that can be closed off in an attack. Avivah Litan, an analyst for Gartner who specializes in cyber-security, said healthcare organizations “are generally less secure than financial service companies who have the same type of customer data.” For example, the attack on JPMorgan Chase last summer compromised the personal information of over 80 million households and small businesses, but the breach was limited to non-financial information because the more sensitive information was walled off, which meant hackers could not penetrate it.

Unfortunately, in healthcare the question isn’t whether the next data breach will occur but rather when will it occur. Balancing out the health information exchange teeter-totter will continue to be a challenge for the healthcare industry. The criminal value of the information that healthcare organizations store combined with the slow adoption of security measures make healthcare organizations prime targets for hackers.

Predictive Analytics To Reduce Patient Readmissions

Patient readmissions are a big problem in U.S. hospitals and have become an area of focus for the healthcare industry and the Government. Patients that are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of Predictive Analytics to Reduce Readmissionsbeing discharged increase healthcare costs approximately $17.5 billion annually. Hospitals are investing in predictive analytics solutions to help reduce patient readmissions and reduce overall medical costs. Predictive analytics can be a powerful tool for healthcare organizations not only to reduce patient readmissions but to help with population health management.

Perficient recently worked with a large healthcare system in Ohio to develop and implement a custom readmissions solution that predicts readmissions across all diseases and conditions. To learn more about this innovative solution, Stephanie Banks, Marketing Manager at Perficient, interviewed Senior Solution Architect, Dale Less. Read the interview here.

IoT Not Just An Acronym: A Powerful Force Transforming Healthcare

Internet of Things (IoT) is not a new term. Nearly 20 years ago an MIT professor described a world where “things” are connected and able to share data. In healthcare, IoT is not a technology trend on the horizon, it is IoT Not Just An Acronym: A Powerful Force Transforming Healthcarehere today, and having an enormous impact on the healthcare industry.

Ninety percent of all of the world’s data has been generated the last two years and that statistic will be blown away in 2015 and the years to come as the IoT continues to grow. In fact, Gartner, Inc. forecasts that 4.9 billion connected things will be in use in 2015, up 30% from 2014, and will reach 25 billion by 2020. Leveraging the invaluable insights enabled by the connection of these devices is what the Internet of Things is all about.

IoT  is a powerful force transforming the way healthcare organizations do business by allowing them to leverage the cloud to reduce operational costs and generate valuable data-driven insights. IoT starts with the data, devices and services within a healthcare organization including EHRs, claims and financial systems. The data from these various sources is combined with new sources of data like wearable devices and in-home monitors, providing a complete patient view across the entire continuum of care. Healthcare organizations are using the cloud to leverage the IoT to reduce operational costs with predictive maintenance and real-time monitoring of medical devices and to lower readmission rates with predictive insights that identify patients who need additional clinical intervention.

Healthcare organizations that implement a strategy to leverage the Internet of Things will improve efficiencies by spending less time managing processes and systems and more time delivering high-quality and cost-effective patient care. Check out 10 Trends Impacting Healthcare in 2015

 

Posted in News

4 Reasons Telehealth will Transform Healthcare

There has always been value in being able to reach healthcare consumers remotely, however, the fee-for-service model and health plans have not supported it. Rising expenses, increasing number of Accountable Care Organizations, elevated interest in consumer engagement, focus on population health management and a shortage of healthcare providers are all driving telehealth.4 Reasons Telehealth will Transform Healthcare Andrew Watson, MD predicts that 85% of healthcare delivery will occur in the home in the next five to six years.1 Telehealth provides convenience to an increasingly busy healthcare consumer and expands access to care while reducing costs. Healthcare Providers need to be including telehealth in their plans or they will miss out on a big opportunity to attract and retain healthcare consumers. Here are four reasons telehealth will transform healthcare:

An Increasing Need for On Demand Care - In years past on-demand care meant dropping into a retail or walk-in clinic to get checked out or to get a prescription. Today, on-demand care means online, from the comfort of your home, even in your pajamas if you wish. More and more people are preferring to email their provider questions or video chat rather than stopping into a near by clinic.

Healthcare reform has provided insurance to more than 40,000 individuals who do not have a formal source of care, making them prime candidates to use telehealth. Additionally, there continues to be a growing need for primary care physicians, in fact it is estimated by 2020 there will be a shortage of 20,400 primary care physicians.1 Telehealth provides a great opportunity to expand primary care capacity, tackle the physician shortage and provide convenient and affordable care.

Healthcare Consumers Driving Their Care - Healthcare consumers are becoming more savvy with their healthcare in terms of leveraging their resources and directing their own care based on personal judgement. They are more accountable for their care and taking responsibility for their preventative care plans. Telehealth may just be the solution to meet the needs of the new healthcare consumer who is seeking convenience and ease as they juggle their busy lives.

Regulatory Barriers Being Addressed - The regulatory environment continues to change to help knock down barriers that have stood in the way of telehealth in the past. Reimbursement eligibility for telehealth services is expanding geographically and new laws are ensuring that certain virtual visits are reimbursed the same way in-person visits are. In addition to government mandates, professional groups are focusing on setting guidelines for evidence-based telemedicine and insurers are partnering directly with telehealth vendors to provide virtual care.

An Emphasis on Customer Experience & Continuum of Care - Healthcare consumers are  frustrated with the increased time they spend in the waiting room and the lack of time spent with the healthcare provider.  With an emphasis being placed on customer experience healthcare providers are expanding their hours to accommodate for the demand, however, this is not sustainable. Telehealth also provides a channel for delivering healthcare that can bridge the gap and provide care across the entire continuum leading to better outcomes and an overall improved customer experience.

Telehealth engages healthcare consumers, provides valuable insights for population health management and offers an option that addresses rising healthcare costs and healthcare provider shortages. The time for telehealth is now and providers must leverage it to transform their business models, improve care management and tackle rising healthcare costs.

Look for telehealth to have an enormous impact on healthcare in 2015. Both healthcare providers and health plans need to start embracing telehealth. Check out 10 Trends Impacting Healthcare in 2015

 

Sources:

1 Healthcare IT News
2 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

#Tech Imperatives for Health Plans to Enhance Customer Experience

Regulations continue to drive changes through the $2.9 trillion dollar healthcare industry, with the goal of transforming the traditional system to improve quality of care and reduce costs. Healthcare customers are #Tech Imperatives for Health Plans to Enhance Customer Experienceseeking price transparency now that they are responsible for a larger portion of the cost of medical services. Health plans must shift their business models to align with an industry that is becoming increasingly competitive and being driven by a more empowered and demanding customer.

Since its inception, the health insurance industry business model has been a B2B operation based on premiums and reimbursements. Today, health insurance organizations are in varying stages of a journey that is transforming them from platforms for purchasing insurance into health management bodies striving to engage their members and provide resources to help them change their health and wellness behaviors. In order to attract new members and retain existing ones, health plan organizations must think like B2C organizations and transform their business models to improve the overall customer experience. They must shift their focus from providing customer service to finding ways to engage their customers.

Health plans must strategically address these technology imperatives, at an enterprise level to enhance the customer experience and succeed in the new world of healthcare:

Digital Strategy - Develop a strong enterprise vision with a road map that utilizes a multichannel enrollment approach (web, mobile, social).

Data Management Strategy – Develop a data management strategy and infrastructure that integrates ALL data, including clinical, and transforms it into actionable, secure and useful insights.

Mobile Strategy – Develop a mobile (mHealth) strategy that embraces mobile applications and leverages them to engage and empower customers.

These technology imperatives must be considered from a strategic perspective in order to meet the true needs of the business.

Transform Unstructured Healthcare Data Into Key Patient Insights

The transformation of the healthcare industry from a fee for service model to a value-based care model will only succeed if healthcare providers are able to generate a complete, 360 degree view of the patient. In a Transform Unstructured Healthcare Data Into Key Patient Insightsrecent blog Stephanie Banks, Senior Marketing Manager at Perficient, talks about how the importance of leveraging technology to uncover value in healthcare data:

Healthcare companies in the digital age are now responsible for vast amounts of data. This data is created and acquired on a daily basis, and the volumes are increasing substantially with each patient visit or interaction.  Some information is stored in pre-determined, structured fields within Electronic Medical Records (EMR), claims or financial systems and is readily accessible with traditional analytics.  Other information, such as doctor’s notes, patient surveys, call center recordings and diagnosis reports is saved in a free-form, textual format and is rarely used for analytics due to the limitations of traditional business intelligence solutions.

Experts suggest that up to 80% of enterprise data exists in an unstructured format, which means a large majority of critical data isn’t being considered or analyzed. Without accounting for this significant percentage of available information, healthcare organizations will find it challenging to make accurate and well-informed decisions that impact patient care and organizational operations.

Read the rest of this post »

Healthcare Patient Portals: Lessons Learned from 2014

Mark Polly, Director at Perficient recently posted a blog titled Lessons Learned from 2014: Healthcare and Patient Portals. In his blog post Mark takes a look at the challenges with healthcare patient portals, including Healthcare Patient Portals; Lessons Learned from 2014whether or not patients know they exist and what elements of a patient portal are most essential.

Read Mark’s entire post here and I would also encourage you to read What the Market Says You Need in Your Patient Portal, a great post by Melody Smith Jones, Manager of Perficient’s Connected Health Practice.

Patient portals shouldn’t just be implemented to meet a regulatory requirement, they should be used as an engagement and empowerment tool for patients.

Using the Finance Playbook to Improve Quality in Healthcare

I loved an article I read in a recent issue of HFMA Magazine in the Healthcare Value section. The title is “The Secret to Building Effective Quality Programs” written by John Byrnes, MD. The finance playbook, described ICD-10 Impacting the Financial Playbook and Improving Qualityby John, includes these cornerstones:

Rule #1: Don’t allow clinicians to calculate cost savings. Finance and clinical counterparts should partner together using transparent calculations and data.

Rule #2: Ensure quality reporting is comprehensive. If a hospital can report financial data for every department, they should be able to report quality data. Make the data available across clinics and define system wide measures.

Rule #3: Ensure quality-control resources are adequate. By demonstrating the business value of quality improvements, the quality department should be able to secure the resources needed to build quality control processes.

Rule #4: Equate Chief Quality Officers to Chief Financial Officers. If it takes the CFO level position to ensure the financial health of the hospital, why wouldn’t we want an equal position to ensure that effective quality control procedures are established?

The common thread here is data and leadership isn’t it? On the data side, enterprise data warehouse solutions are important to source data for common measures for the hospital. This intersection of quality and finance also will be affected by the upcoming conversion from ICD-9 to ICD-10 coding methods. By permitting more-specific coding of patient conditions, it may be possible for care management organizations to identify which members require disease management and to tailor programs more precisely to their conditions, thereby raising the efficacy of disease management and saving both lives and money.

This article initially attracted my interest because of my background in finance and operational analytics, but I also had an unfortunate encounter with a mid-size hospital system recently with a family member that shook me to the core. There was no Quality Officer and no incident reporting process in place and no one to turn to after a life threatening situation unfolded with a close family member. My heart sank not only for my loved one, but for those who would encounter this in the future. I did report this to the Joint Commission and I hope that the culture has changed for this organization.

@teriemc

 

Telehealth – Impacting Access, Cost and Quality

Where did 2014 go? It flew by…then again after I turned 30, I feel like every year is flying by. As this year Telehealth Impacting Access, Cost and Qualitycomes to a close and planning begins for the upcoming year, like most organizations in the United States, my organization is going through an “open enrollment” period for healthcare benefits, allowing employees to make adjustments to their current healthcare benefits for next year. I rarely change my healthcare benefits. I usually just skim through the HR documents in the slim chance something major changed from the year prior. Ninety-nine percent of the time, nothing changes. However, to my surprise, this year, something maj or, and impressive, did change. For the first time, our healthcare benefits were going to include telemedicine. Amazing!

What is Telemedicine…or is it Telehealth?

Oftentimes we see “telehealth” interchangeably used with “telemedicine,” but there is a slight nuance between the two. According to Dr. Stephen Perkins, Vice president of Medical Affairs UMPC Health Plan, “Telehealth is a general term describing the delivery of health-related services and information by the use of telecommunication technology. It can include phone calls between physicians, videoconferencing or even robotic technology.” Telemedicine has a narrower definition: The specific use of medical information that is exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications for the health and education of a patient or a health care provider for the purpose of improving patient care. It includes consultative, diagnostic and treatment services1.”

The Impact of Telehealth

As the healthcare industry continues to go through major transformation, it is no surprise that healthcare providers are trying to find innovative ways, such as telemedicine, to deliver efficient and effective patient care. Through telehealth, providers can impact access, cost and quality to help achieve this.

  1. Improve AccessibilityTelemedicine allows providers and patients to bridge the distance and time barriers that separate them. Rashid Bashshur does a fantastic job, describing the impact to access of care from both the provider and patient side2:

Providers2: Accessibility for providers in both remote and central sites relates to convenience, opportunity cost, and work load. Providers located in remote and isolated areas and institutions will have ready access to consultants and referral sources. With telemedicine, they may encounter less “red tape” in arranging for both consultations and referrals. Remote providers may be able to alleviate their work load and coverage during off-hours because of their link to medical centers and the use of non-physician providers. Providers located at tertiary care centers will be able to offer their expertise to a much larger and diverse provider and client population compared to those only seen at their medical centers.

Patients2: The target populations and the major beneficiaries of telemedicine are the geographically remote, the institutionally confined, and those otherwise medically underserved, including inner city residents and the elderly. The substitution of telemedicine for person to-person encounters reduces the need for travel and the related opportunity costs and other inconveniences encountered in the process of obtaining care. Instead of having to travel to distant tertiary care centers for specialized, and sometimes even routine, services, residents of rural areas, correctional institutions, and nursing homes could receive an array of services via telemedicine. Only when it is determined appropriate through consultation with specialists would it be necessary for clients to be referred or transferred to be served at the medical centers.

Patients don’t have to live in rural or remote areas to reap the benefits of access to care through telehealth. Access can also be related to sheer convenience. Many of us truly just don’t have time to get to the doctor. Penciling in a lunch-hour visit with our physician can prove challenging, especially when a can’t-miss conference call absorbs the bulk of our afternoon3. According to Jessica Harper, telemedicine eases this problem -through video, Web chat, or phone, workers can follow-up on a prescription or diagnosis with a physician and reduce the time you spend in the waiting room, flipping through yet another mind numbing magazine3.

  1. Influence Costs – Telehealth reduces overall healthcare costs and can potentially generate an increase in revenue.

Contain Cost – The Center for Information Technology Leadership estimates that widespread use of telehealth systems to promote preventive care, early intervention and effective information sharing could save the United States $3.61 billion annually4. Telemedicine reduces travel expenses, especially for those living in rural communities, where they would need to normally travel hours out of their way to access key health services3. In addition, the number of days of work people take for routine visits can add up in lost wages. According to a recent study, with telemedicine, 92% of patients saved $32 in fuel costs; 84% saved $100 in wages; and 74% saved $75-$150 in family expenses5. Even more astonishing, $1.2 billion could be saved by video consultations between doctors and patients in cases where office visits are not practical5. In addition, many providers actual charge less for a telemedicine consultation than they do for a face-to-face visit.

Increase in Revenue- If time and distance barriers to care are removed, use of service is likely to increase, which in turn increases the volume without declining the cost and resulting in an increase in revenue generation2. Improved operations can also prove to be a revenue generator. According to a recent study in Telemedicine and e-Health, hospitals that utilized telemedicine technology and referred patients to other hospital facilities, specifically children’s facilities, saw their revenue significantly increase6. The research looked at 16 hospitals’ billings before and after they implemented telemedicine tools. Before the implementation of telemedicine, the 16 hospitals recorded 143 transfer patients. After deployment the number jumped to 285, resulting in a revenue jump, going from $2.4 million beforehand to $4 million6.

  1. Improve Quality-Enhancing quality of care, through more timely delivery care, care coordination and patient engagement is also an advantage to telemedicine.

Timeliness to Care – The National Healthcare Disparities Report (2009), states that, timely delivery of appropriate care has been shown to improve health care outcomes and delaying health care can lead to a diagnosis at a more advanced disease stage and reduce opportunities for optimal treatment5. The window to receive treatment for many disorders is typically small and early detection and diagnosis can be vital. Ongoing remote monitoring and the ability for patients to check in with providers via telemedicine, before something worse happens, makes a positive difference in patient outcomes and satisfaction7.

Care Coordination – According to Kevin J. Boyle, “Transition care typically includes both patient education and medication management components to help ease the transition from hospital to residential facilities and reduce readmissions. While face-to-face communication is ideal, it is often impractical. Telemedicine provides a quick, convenient and more affordable forum for assessing patient recovery, assisting with medication management and keeping patients on track with discharge instructions. Advanced high-definition video capabilities can also help clinicians’ document key indicators of recovery and conduct demonstrations for self-care or physical therapy techniques8”, especially those with chronic conditions.

Patient Engagement – Providers can involve their patients in their own healthcare, thus improving compliance and, over time, clinical outcomes. Randall S. Moore, MD, MBA, states that, “One of the most interesting and promising outcomes of telehealth programs has been the increase in patient participation and self-care. Because patients have an active role in their care plan and are in more frequent contact with their healthcare provider, they gain a better understanding of their condition and become more compliant in their care.9” Patients want to take a more active role in their healthcare and see technology, such as telehealth, as a mean to helping them achieve this important goal.

Telehealth has continued to grow as a unique way of delivering care to patients, while greatly improving access, reducing cost and positively impacting quality. The number of patients using telehealth services is expected to jump from the 350,000 in 2013 to about seven million by 201810. Despite this staggering increase in users, there are still some barriers preventing its wide-spread use, such as resistance on the part of providers, limited insurance coverage and reimbursement, and privacy and security issues. However, over the past few years these challenges seem to be lessening as the healthcare industry, as a whole, is understanding the benefits of telehealth and from the looks of it, it seems like telehealth is here to stay as a recognized part of healthcare delivery.

What do you think? Do you think telehealth and telemedicine can change the healthcare industry?

Resources for this blog post:

  1. http://www.upmchealthplan.com/pdf/smart_business/February_2014.pdf
  2. http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/44995/10916_2005_Article_BF02257059.pdf?sequence=1
  3. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2012/07/24/pros-and-cons-of-telemedicine-for-todays-workers
  4. http://www.corp.att.com/healthcare/docs/connected_hc.pdf
  5. http://accesstelehealth.org/benefits/lower-cost
  6. http://healthworkscollective.com/waxcom/116071/using-telemedicine-increase-hospital-revenue
  7. http://venturebeat.com/2014/10/20/why-telemedicines-window-is-finally-opening/
  8. http://www.healthmgttech.com/articles/201210/improving-care-coordination.php
  9. http://www.psqh.com/janfeb05/viewpoint.html
  10. http://www.healthitoutcomes.com/doc/barriers-to-telehealth-s-growth-0001